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ABNRML PSYCH 2018

Mr. Stickler's Liberty Christian PSYCH. "Abnormal Psych." Test Flashcards 2018

QuestionAnswer
What are the main symptoms that people living with Paranoid Schizophrenia experience? Auditory hallucinations; Visual Hallucinations; paranoia; anxiety; and panic attacks.
What are the main symptoms that people living with Major Depressive Disorder experience? Feelings of extreme sadness; Anxiety (including social anxiety); Increase in sleeping; Exhaustion and lethargy.
What are the main symptoms that people living with Antisocial Personality Disorder experience? Persistent lying/ deceit to exploit others; Disregard for Right and wrong; Complete lack of empathy for others; Unnecessary risk - taking or dangerous behavior.
Where was the first mental health institution built in the United States? The Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane.
Who built the first mental health institutions? Religious groups such as the Quakers and the Society of Friends.
Which mental health institution was the “1st built in the Appalachian Mountains area”? This was the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in Lexington, Kentucky.
What does the term "personality" mean/ refer to? "The characteristic thoughts, emotional responses, and behaviors that are relatively stable over time and across circumstances".
What types of assessments do personality tests based on "projective measures" use? These personality tests examine a person's unconscious thoughts, so they have people interpret ambiguous stimuli.
What types of assessments do personality tests based on "objective measures" use? These personality tests are based on information gathered through self - report questionnaires or observer ratings.
What does the term "temperaments" mean/ refer to? This term refers to "general tendencies to feel or act in certain ways. These are broader than personality traits. Temperaments are also innate biological structures of personality, so they are NOT altered by life experiences.
what does the term "psychopathology" mean/ refer to? This term means "sickness or disorder of the mind".
What does the term "etiology" mean/ refer to? This term refers to "the factors that contribute to the understanding of a psychological disorder".
What religious group established the first asylum to "treat" people who had been diagnosed with mental disorders? The Quakers did this.
What was the name of the 1st asylum built in the United States? Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane was the name of this asylum. (Class notes.)
List the names of the two (2) religious groups responsible for establishing asylums for people who had been diagnosed with mental disorders. 1.) Quakers; 2.) The Society of Friends (also known as the Friends Church). (Class notes.)
How were patients treated in the earliest mental asylums? 1.) Patients were shackled to the walls in the basement of the facility; 2.) Cruel, primitive treatments such as "ice water baths" were used; 3.) In some asylums, upper class citizens were given tours so they could "marvel" at patient's behavior.
What is the "DSM - V (5)"? This is the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition". It is the manual that doctors, psychiatrists, & other health professionals use to diagnose mental illnesses. (Pg. 603)
How is information organized in the "DSM-V"? Information is organized by categories (of various mental illnesses). (EX: "Depressive Disorders", "Anxiety Disorders", etc.).
What does the term "maladaptive" mean/ refer to? This term means "unsuitably adapted or adapting poorly to (a situation, purpose, etc)". (dictionary.com)
How does the term "maladaptiveness" relate to abnormal psychology? It is believed that people who have been diagnosed with a mental illness are simply displaying "maladaptive" behavior - not "deviant" behavior. (Pg. 602)
How are disorders described in the "DSM-V"? These are described in terms of observable symptoms.
What are the three (3) sections of the "DSM-V"? 1.) Introduction; 2.) Diagnostic criteria for all of the disorders; 3.) A guide for future "psychopathology" research.
List the names of the two (2) approaches to assessing mental illnesses. 1.) Categorical Approach; 2.) Dimensional Approach.
What is one (1) criticism of the "Categorical Approach" to assessing mental illness? One (1) criticism of this is that a patient is either in the category, or they are not. This "fails to capture the differences in the severity of the disorder".
Why do many mental health professionals prefer a "Dimensional Approach" to assessing mental illness? mental health professionals prefer this approach because it "recognizes that many psychological disorders are extreme versions of normal feelings".
What does the term "neuroticism" mean/ refer to? This term "involves the tendency to experience frequent and intense negative emotions".
What does the term "Research Domain Criteria" mean/ refer to? This term refers to "an assessment method that defines basic aspects of functioning and considers them across multiple levels of analysis, from genes to brain systems to behavior".
List the names of the various models that are used to explain the origins of mental illness. 1.) Family Systems Model; 2.) Sociocultural Model; 3.) Diathesis-Stress Model; 4.) Cognitive-Behavioral Approach.
What is the difference between "internalizing disorders" and "externalizing disorders"? "Internalizing disorders" are characterized by negative emotions while "externalizing disorders" are characterized by disinhibition.
How are "Anxiety Disorders" characterized? These disorders are characterized by "excessive fear and anxiety in the absence of true danger".
List the names of three (3) mental illnesses that would qualify as "Anxiety Disorders". 1.) Social Anxiety Disorder; 2.) Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; 3.) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.
How are "Depressive Disorders" categorized? These disorders are characterized by "the presence of sad, empty, or irritable mood along with bodily symptoms & cognitive problems that interfere with daily life".
List the names of three (3) mental illnesses that would qualify as "Depressive Disorders". 1.) Major Depressive Disorder; 2.) Persistent Depressive Disorder; 3.) Seasonal Affective Disorder.
When we watched the video "Lauren's Story" in class, what were 3 of the symptoms that the two people in the video described themselves as having?? 1.) Inability to motivate themselves to even get out of bed at all during the day; 2.) Feelings of helplessness - like there is nothing that can be done to help them; 3.) Intense feelings of loneliness. (Video - "Lauren's Story")
What is the "main characteristic" of "Bipolar Disorders"? One characteristic of this is the presence of "manic" episodes.
Describe what patients experience during a "manic episode". These are characterized by "abnormally & persistently elevated mood, increased activity, diminished need for sleep, & extreme distractabilty".
What are "hypomania" states characterized by? These are characterized by "heightened creativity & productivity".
We watched two videos related to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - "Mary's Story" and "Dawn's Story" - in class. List 4 of the symptoms that these two ladies were living with. 1.) Outbursts of "excessive" anger (very minor things would trigger this for Dawn); 2.) Social anxiety (especially true for Dawn); 3.) Sensitive to sights/sounds/smells that remind them of the traumatic event(s); 4.) Depression.
In class, we read Chapter 34 - "The Emperor of Antarctica" - in "A Beautiful Mind". What schizophrenia symptoms was John Nash living with in that chapter? (Be able to explain or give an example of what each of the symptoms you list means.) 1.) Persecutory, Referential, & Grandiose Delusions; 2.) Confused Thoughts & Disorganized Speech; 3.) Trouble Concentrating (we can safely assume this); 4.) Visual and Auditory Hallucinations.
In class, we watched a video that I called "David's Story". David was a person living with Psychogenic Fugue. What are the symptoms of this mental illness? 1.) Problems with daily functioning; 2.) Inability to recall past events or important information about their life; 3.) Sudden & unplanned travel away from home; 4.) Confusion/ loss of memory about identity (may assume new identity to make up for loss)
In class, we watched a video that I called "Efren's Story". Efren was a person living with Bipolar Disorder. List two (2) symptoms that Efren described in the video. 1.) Inability to sleep (insomnia) during his 9 - week "manic" cycle; 2.) Suicidal thoughts with a plan (his friend's comments about breaking up with his fiance were the only thing that stopped his "completion" of his plan).
In class, we watched a video that I called "Efren's Story". Efren was a person living with Bipolar Disorder. What two (2) treatments does he describe that proved to be successful for him? 1.) Electroshock therapy; 2.) Extensive counseling.
In class, we watched a video that I called "Natasha's Story". Natasha was a person living with Dysthymia. What does she say this mental illness is often called? She says that this is also called "Functional Depression".
In class, we watched a video that I called "Natasha's Story". Natasha was a person living with Dysthymia. List two (2) of the symptoms that she describes living with. 1.) General unexplained "sadness" (when her friends asked her why she was crying, she told them, "I don't know.") 2.) Inability to find pleasure in daily life (she said that she still went to work & did things with friends, but it wasn't fun).
In class, we watched a video that I called "Stephanie A's. Story". Stephanie A. was a person living with Agoraphobia. List two (2) of the symptoms that she describes living with. 1.) Leaving her home triggered panic attacks; 2.) Hyperventilating.
In class, we watched a video that I called "Stephanie L's. Story". Stephanie L. was a person living with Panic Disorder. List two (2) of the symptoms that she describes living with. 1.) Increased heart rate (her heart rate was 140 beats per minute); 2.) Feeling light-headed like she was going to pass out; 3.) Irrational fear of having serious medical issue (ex: she thought she was having a heart attack, but had no hx of this).
In class, we watched a video that I called "Eric's Story". Eric was a person living with Obsessive - Compulsive Disorder. List three (3) symptoms that Eric describes - or the video demonstrates - that he is living with. 1.) Obsession with cleanliness (He took an extraordinarily long time taking a shower to ensure he was germ free); 2.) Compulsion with order (things having to be in their "places"); 3.) Compulsion with numbers & counting (# of snacks to bake).
What does the term "obsession" mean/ refer to? This term refers to "recurrent, intrusive, and unwanted thoughts or ideas or mental images. They often include fear of contamination, accidents, or of one's own aggression".
What does the term "compulsion" mean/ refer to? This term refers to acts that a person living with obsessive - compulsive disorder feels driven to perform over and over. The most common compulsive behaviors are cleaning, checking, and counting.
What does the term "comorbidity" mean/ refer to? This term refers to "secondary" mental illnesses that a patient may be living with that can complicate their situation, resulting in the need to treat multiple mental illnesses simultaneously. (EX: a patient may be living with Agoraphobia & PTSD.)
Created by: sticklerpjpII