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WGU Ethics Mod. 6

WGU Ethics terms

QuestionAnswer
Who was the great German philosopher focused on duty-driven ethics, sometimes called deontology? Immanuel Kant
Who believes that the guilty will their punishments through Universal law. Immanuel Kant
Whose ethics primarily concern human self determination and freedom. Immanuel Kant
Consistent or inconsistent with Kant on human autonomy and dignity: One should not strive to benefit from one's interaction with others. Consistant
Consistent or inconsistent with Kant on human autonomy and dignity: It is wrong to treat others merely as tools to be used to attain a goal of maximum happiness. Consistant
Consistent or inconsistent with Kant on human autonomy and dignity: People must recognize others' capacity to give or withhold consent. Consistant
Consistent or inconsistent with Kant on human autonomy and dignity: Respect for human dignity requires people to act to maximize their pleasure and minimize their pain. Inconsistant
Consistent or inconsistent with Kant on human autonomy and dignity: True autonomy results from acting according to desires, without regard to moral permissability. Inconsistant
What are ethical theories that maintain that the moral rightness or wrongness of an action depends on its intrinsic qualities, and not on its practical consequences Deontological ethics
What is an absolute and universal moral demand or obligation founded on reasoning. Categorical Imperative
From which all our duties and obligations are derived is called? Categorical Imperative
What comes to us through reason; it is more important than anything personal we wish or desire. Categorical Imperative
Categorical Imperative is an absolute and universal moral demand or obligation founded on reasoning. According to... Kant
It is a rule for making other rules (or what Kant calls ... maxims
An act is categorical if it is something that applies to ________ in _____. everyone in all instances
For Kant considered categorical imperatives to be binding on rational agents,you had to be willing to have _____act on that rule. everyone
Once an action is defined as a categorical imperative it (is or is not) up to you to choose whether you should follow it. is not, it must be followed.
In Kant's ethical system a _____ _____ must be acted on the same way and every time the situation arises. categorical imperative
What are actions conditioned on some goal or desire. hypothetical imperatives
What have “if” statements: “If you want to pass the course, you ought to study for it.” hypothetical imperatives
What is a procedure for reasoning if an act is morally permissible and if it is a moral obligation. A formal principle. Maxim
According to Kant: A moral demand or obligation with no exceptions; actions based on this rule are always right (or wrong) independently of any further considerations. Absolute Rules
What rules allow us to be moral agents whose conduct is guided by universal laws. Absolute Rules
In Kant’s ethical system these would be the human skeleton below the flesh. Absolute Rules
What is unconditional good? Good Will
To apprehend what they should do and to do it from a sense of duty is called? Good Will
Being in control of your own life is called? Autonomy
The applicability of a moral rule to all is called? Universalizability
All humans should be treated with unconditioned esteem and respect is called? Dignity
Kant believes that humans are “above all price,” expressing that this value--its worth--is limitless or infinite. Dignity
Kant argued: “Always treat humanity, whether in yourself or in other people, as an end in itself and never as a mere means.” primacy of human dignity
This is the unconditional respect and esteem all humans should receive just in virtue of being rational and human. Dignity
Kant did not think personal ______ was a right to be bestowed but rather it was the natural expression of all humans. freedom
Kant was a fervent(passionate) believer in the rights of _______ of thought and speech. freedom
Kant’s accounts of human _______ demands that we view human agents as capable of self-determination, and principle of duty. freedom
What is the ancient law of retaliation? Retributivism
Kant believes that justice by retribution(paybacks) adheres to his concept of ________. human dignity
Punishment can only address the crime, and it must be proportionate to the crime. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
"an eye for an eye." Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
justice treats criminals as rational agents who are responsible for their conduct. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
If we respond with punishment that is "in kind" with the crime we are adhering to justice because we are punishing no more and no less than what is equal to the crime. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
punishment also respects the guilty; punishment is the will of the guilty: "His own evil deed draws the punishment upon himself." Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
Punishment treats the guilty as ends-in-themselves. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Kant's Principle
Wants punishment to benefit society. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Punishment begins with acceptance that punishment is evil because it is identified with the mistreatment of a person. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Only justification for using punishment is if it increases the good for the greatest number of people. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Provides comfort to victims and families. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Reduces the number of criminals on the street. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
acts as a deterrent against criminal behavior. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Punishment offers the opportunity to rehabilitate the criminal and return him or her to society as a productive citizen. Kant (Retributivism)or Bentham (Utilitarian) philosophy? Bentham's Principle
Created by: ldepaepe