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Cog & Behav Theories

Covers cognitive and behavioral therapies terms as it relates to the LMSW Exam.

TermDefinition
Behavioral Therapy This therapy's success is contingent upon the client's commitment to change and effective client/counselor interaction.
Classical Conditioning This theory was created by Ivan Pavlov.
Applied Behavior Analysis Theory This type of behavioral theory focuses on actual behavior rather than cognitive processes and sees behavior as a function of its consequences. (This term is 4 words long)
Neuro Behavioristic Stimulus Response Therapy This type of behavioral therapy focuses on systematic desensitization and covert conditioning and is concerned with extinguishing causes of anxiety. (This term is 5 words long).
Social Learning Theory This type of behavioral therapy views current behaviors, cognitive processes, and the environment as working together to influence behavior and stresses mediation, external stimuli, and external reinforcement.
Cognitive Behavior Modification Therapy This type of behavioral therapy aims at cognitive restructuring and emphasizes altering irrational ideas, perceptions, and interpretations of experiences.
Biofeedback A clinical technique used to help a person learn to relax by monitoring muscle tension, heart rate, brainwave activity, or other body activities.
Contingency Contracts This is often presented in the form of a chart or table that lists desired behaviors and provides a space for noting whether the desired behaviors were achieved. It describes the conditions that must be met for the individual to be rewarded.
Extinction In classical conditioning, the decrease in response resulting from repeated presentation of the conditioned stimulus without the presence of the unconditioned stimulus.
Positive Reinforcement Increasing behaviors by presenting positive stimuli, such as candy, when the desired behavior is performed.
Premack Principle Principle that a less frequently performed behavior can be increased in frequency by reinforcing it with a more frequent behavior
Token Economy An operant conditioning procedure in which people earn a token of some sort for exhibiting a desired behavior and can later exchange the tokens for various privileges or treats.
Contiguity Theory Guthrie's idea that learning depends on a stimulus and response occurring together in time rather than depending on reinforcement.
Classical Conditioning This theory confirms the crucial part that antecedents play in learned behavior.
Classical Conditioning This theory is commonly used to treat phobias, anxieties, and aberrant behavior.
Respondent Conditioning B.F. Skinner later changed the name Classical Conditioning to.......
Stimulus Generalization Process by which a conditioned response becomes associated with a stimulus that is similar but not identical to the original conditioned stimulus.
Counter Conditioning A behavior therapy procedure that conditions new responses to stimuli that trigger unwanted behaviors; based on classical conditioning
Systemic Desensitization A type of exposure therapy that associates a pleasant relaxed state with gradually increasing anxiety-triggering stimuli. Commonly used to treat phobias.
Reciprocal Inhibition If a response inhibitory to anxiety occurs in the presence of anxiety-evoking stimuli, it weakens the connection between the stimuli and the anxiety. This is called:
Operant Conditioning This theory was created by B.F Skinner.
Operant Conditioning This theory uses consequences to alter the form and frequency of behavior, focusing on modifying voluntary behavior.
Negative Reinforcement In Operant Condition, the increasing behaviors by removing a stimuli. (Note: This is not to be confused with punishment.)
Punishment In Operant Condition, an event that decreases the behavior that it follows.
Positive Punishment In Operant Condition, this term is used to explain how a behavior is followed immediately by the presentation of a stimulus that decreases the future frequency of the behavior works. (Adding a negative stimuli)
Negative Punishment In Operant Condition, this term is used to explain how decreasing behavior by stopping or reducing positive stimuli works. (Subtracting a positive stimuli)
Fixed Interval In Operant Conditioning , this is a type of partial reinforcement. Rewards are provided after a specified time interval has passed.
Variable Interval In Operant Conditioning , this is a type of partial reinforcement. Rewards are provided after a unpredictable time interval has passed.
Fixed Ratio In Operant Conditioning , this is a type of reward system in which rewards are delivered following a specific number of behaviors
Variable Ratio In Operant Conditioning , this is a type of partial reinforcement. Rewards are provided after an unpredictable number of responses.
Satiation In Operant Conditioning , this is a decrease in the frequency of operant behavior presumed to be the result of continued contact with a reinforcer that has followed that behavior. The client is no longer "hungry" for the stimuli.
Immediacy In Operant Conditioning , this is a closeness in time that a feedback is given in response to a behavior.
Size In Operant Conditioning , this is the determination the client makes about whether the behavior is worth the effort. It weighs positive and negative consequences.
Jacobson Method In Operant Conditioning , this is a progressive relaxation therapy technique that focuses on tightening and relaxing certain muscles in a certain sequence
Law of Effect Thorndike's principle that behaviors followed by favorable consequences become more likely, and that behaviors followed by unfavorable consequences become less likely.
Differential Reinforcement In Operant Conditioning , this is a process that combines extinction of unwanted behavior and positive reinforcement for desirable behavior.
Vicarious Conditioning In Operant Conditioning , this is a conditioning of a reflex response or emotion by watching the reaction of another person
Primary Vicarious Conditioning In Operant Conditioning , this is when an observer sees the models behavior reinforced and then performs the same behavior, this is called.....
Secondary Vicarious Conditioning In Operant Conditioning , this occurs when symbolic representations of behavior and it's consequences are absorbed through reading, looking at maps or other images or from a verbalized description. This is called......
Avoidance Learning In Operant Conditioning , this is a process by which one learns to perform a behavior in order to ensure that a negative or aversive stimulus will not be present.
Noncontingent Reinforcement In Operant Conditioning , this is a procedure in which stimuli with known reinforcing properties are presented on a fixed-time (FT) or variable-time (VT) schedules completely independent of behavior; often used as an antecedent.
Maturation Theory Not to be confused with Erikson's version of this theory, Arnold Gesell used this theory to explain that genetic inheritance is internally controlling human development against an environmental backdrop.
Brief Therapy Seeing the past as less important and the present as the primary focus, this therapy focuses on specific problems within a limited time frame.
Cognitive Therapy The primary target of this therapy is identification of negative or distorted automatic thoughts.
Schemas In Cognitive Therapy, this term is coined to explain concepts or mental frameworks that organize and interpret information.
Collaborative Empiricism A concept from Aaron Beck's cognitive therapy that views the client as capable of making objective interpretations of his or her behavior, with the collaboration of the therapist
10-20 Cognitive therapy is usually short term lasting for how many sessions?
Good Working Relationship The early phase of cognitive therapy focuses on this
Modifying Dysfunction The middle phase of cognitive therapy focuses on this
Reinforcing Skills The final phase of cognitive therapy focuses on this
Self, Experiences, Future Aaron Beck believed that a client's difficulties are the result of distorted construction of reality on these three levels.
Cognitive Therapy This therapy is most effective for clients who are dealing with phobias and/or depression.
Core Beliefs In Cognitive Theory, schemas are sometimes called.....
two way street In Cognitive Theory, the relationship between cognition and behavior is often called a.......(3 words)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Donald Meichenbaum created this theory (Hint: it is often attributed to Beck)
Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy This therapy envisions emotional consequences as being created by an individual's belief system rather than the environment.
Family In rational emotive behavioral therapy, what is considered to be the major factor in a person's early development?
Self Talk The rational emotive behavioral therapist views this as the source of emotional disturbance.
Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy This therapy utilizes the following model: Activating event Belief Consequent effect Disputing of the irrational belief Effect
Rational Beliefs According to Ellis, these beliefs are based on facts and realistic appraisals and keep stress levels low.
Irrational beliefs According to Ellis, these beliefs are based on distorted, self-destructive assumptions that interferes with your thinking; delusions.
Activating Event According to Ellis, a physical, social, or physiology event or conditioning that triggers a stress response is an _________ ___________?
Positive Preferential Evaluation REBT. Statement that is relative, non-absolute, and in the positive.
Positive Musturbatory Evaluation REBT. Statement that is absolute, dogmatic, and assumes what the person must have in a devout way.
Didactic Discussion This method is a teaching method that follows a consistent scientific approach or educational style to engage the client's mind and is often contrasted with dialectics and the Socratic method.
Bibliotherapy The use of self-help books and other reading materials as a form of therapy.
Active Directive This approach of REBT treats a person holistically with emphasis on biological factors of personality development.
Solution Focused Therapy This therapy is a form of brief therapy.
Solution Focused Therapy This therapy coined the phrase: "If it isn't broke, don't fix it. If it's working, do more of it. If it's not working, o something else".
Solution Focused Therapy In this therapy there are no absolutes.
Solution Focused Therapy In this therapy a therapist does not inforce his view of normality.
Complainant In Solution Focused Therapy this is a client who isn't willing to work toward solving problems.
Customer In Solution Focused Therapy this is a client who is motivated to change.
Cognitive Dissonance Coined by Leon Festinger, this term explains inner tension that a consumer experiences after recognizing an inconsistency between behavior and values or opinions
Contextual Therapy Developed by Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagy, this therapy stresses what he called "therapeutic leverages in mobilizing trust".
Fairness This is the main focus of Contextual Therapy with families and is created by setting boundaries.
Leader Contextual therapy will not work if the social worker takes on this role.
Here and Now This is the focus of Existential Therapy.
Existential Therapy This therapy works best with clients who have little to no psychopathology.
Existential Therapy There are four main themes to this therapy: death, freedom & responsibility, isolation, and meaninglessness.
Mitwelt In Existential therapy, this term refers to one's relationship with other people.
Umwelt In Existential therapy, this term refers to one's relationship with the environment.
Eigenwelt In Existential therapy, this term refers to one's relationship with himself/herself.
Phenomenology The direct study of experiences taken at face value.
Natural Anxiety Existential Therapy uses this to promote growth.
Existential Guilt According to Jean-Paul Sarte, this is the consciousness a person has of evading commitment to make personal choices.
Utilitarianism Self-disclosing of the therapist's emotional response to the client's demonstration of valuing the client's feelings and perspective.
I Though Dialogue Part of the "I Though Dialogue vs I It Dialogue" found in Existential Theory, this aspect contains the following: 1) Human confirms the other person as being of equal value 2) Direct mutual relationship
I It Dialogue Part of the "I Though Dialogue vs I It Dialogue" found in Existential Theory, this aspect contains the following: 1) Person uses others but does not value them for themselves 2) Person focuses on self-fulfilling and self-serving
Existential Therapy The goal of this therapy is to help clients recognize the ways in which they passively accepted circumstances and surrendered control.
Existential Therapy This therapy encourages clients to do the following three things: ---Reflect on life ---Recognize the range of alternatives ---Decide among them
Encourager In Existential Therapy this is the role of the therapist with the goal of the client reaching autonomy.
Existential Anxiety Existential Therapy encourages the client to use this in a positive way rather than a negative way.
Systems Theory This is both a theory and a therapy that explores how a group of organisms work together to accomplish one result.
Systems Theory It is only as great as the sum of its parts.
Systems Theory It is only as strong as its weakest part.
Homeostasis In Systems Theory, this is used to describe the way in which people try to keep things the same so as to avoid problems.
Negative Feedback In Systems Theory, this is behavioral reaction that stabilize a process system, returning it to its equilibrium state.
Positive Feedback In Systems Theory, this is proactive behavior that rocks the equilibrium of the family system and causes issues within the system.
Calibration In Systems Theory, this is the normal or standard operational system of the family.
Wholeness In Systems Theory, this is when all of the family members combine to one family system in interdependence.
Equifinality In Systems Theory, this is when the same result can come from different family systems.
Equipotentiality In Systems Theory, this is when one cause can produce different results. EX: Two children who have been sexually abused. When older one has a fear of sex while the other is promiscuous.
First Order Change In Systems Theory, this is when superficial behavioral changes within the structure of a system occur but do not change the structure of the system itself
Second Order Change In Systems Theory, this involves an actual change to the family structure that alters the behavior
Systems Theory This theory focuses on: Belief systems Rules, regulation, and roles Expectations and value systems Support systems Family hierarchy
Created by: searcysm