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Structure Matter

Structure and Property Matter

TermDefinition
Thermal Energy Thermal energy is generated and measured by heat of any kind. It is caused by the increased activity or velocity of molecules in a substance, which in turn causes temperature to rise accordingly.
solid having three dimensions (length, breadth, and thickness), as a geometrical body or figure.
liquid composed of molecules that move freely among themselves but do not tend to separate like those of gases; neither gaseous nor solid.
gas Physics. a substance possessing perfect molecular mobility and the property of indefinite expansion, as opposed to a solid or liquid.
plasma Anatomy, Physiology. the liquid part of blood or lymph, as distinguished from the suspended elements.
colloid Physical Chemistry. a substance made up of a system of particles with linear dimensions in the range of about 10 −7 to 5 × 10 −5 cm dispersed in a continuous gaseous, liquid, or solid medium whose properties depend on the large specific surface area. The
phase change Phase Change: Evaporation, Condensation, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation & Deposition. Substances on Earth can exist in one of four phases, but mostly, they exist in one of three: solid, liquid or gas.
particle Physics. one of the extremely small constituents of matter, as an atom or nucleus.
melting point The melting point (or, rarely, liquefaction point) of a solid is the temperature at which it changes state from solid to liquid at atmospheric pressure. At the melting point the solid and liquid phase exist in equilibrium.
freezing point freezing point definition. The temperature at which a liquid changes into a solid; the same temperature as the melting point. (See phases of matter.) Note: Water freezes at thirty-two degrees Fahrenheit or zero degrees Celsius.
boiling point The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the pressure surrounding the liquid and the liquid changes.
evaporation Evaporation is a type of vaporization of a liquid that occurs from the surface of a liquid into a gaseous phase that is not saturated with the evaporating substance. The other type of vaporization is boiling, which is characterized by bubbles of saturated
condensation Condensation is the change of water from its gaseous form (water vapor) into liquid water. Condensation generally occurs in the atmosphere when warm air rises, cools and looses its capacity to hold water vapor. As a result, excess water vapor condenses to
volume a book forming part of a work or series. the amount of space that a substance or object occupies, or that is enclosed within a container, especially when great.
mass In physics, the property of matter that measures its resistance to acceleration. Roughly, the mass of an object is a measure of the number of atoms in it. The basic unit of measurement for mass is the kilogram. (See Newton's laws of motion; compare weight
density the degree of compactness of a substance.
pure substance A material that is composed of only one type of particle; examples of a pure substance include gold, oxygen and water. Mixture. A material made up of at least two different pure substances. Mechanical Mixture. A mixture in which each material maintains it
atom the basic unit of a chemical element.
molecule a group of atoms bonded together, representing the smallest fundamental unit of a chemical compound that can take part in a chemical reaction.
element a part or aspect of something abstract, especially one that is essential or characteristic.
compound a thing that is composed of two or more separate elements; a mixture.
extended structure A structure that has been extended.
physical change Physical changes are changes affecting the form of a chemical substance, but not its chemical composition. Physical changes are used to separate mixtures into their component compounds, but can not usually be used to separate compounds into chemical eleme
chemical change Chemical change is any change that results in the formation of new chemical substances. At the molecular level, chemical change involves making or breaking of bonds between atoms. These changes are chemical: iron rusting (iron oxide forms)
natural resource These things include water (seas and fresh water), land, soils, rocks, forests (vegetation), animals (including fish), fossil fuels and minerals. They are called Natural Resources and are the basis of life on earth. All these mentioned above are natural,
synthetic material Synthetic fabrics are textiles made from man-made rather than natural fibers. Examples of synthetic fabrics include polyester, acrylic, nylon, rayon, acetate, spandex, lastex,orlon and Kevlar. Synthetic (chemically produced) fibres are made by joining mon
Created by: FrankZhang