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Unit 4

Rad Procedures

QuestionAnswer
What is the definition a hypersthenic body habitus? The largest; The chest area is short, with a high diaphragm. The stomach, gallbladder, and colon are high and lateral pg. 81
What is a sthenic body habitus? An average athletic build; A longer chest longer chest and abdomen, with viscera more medially pg. 81
What is a hyposthenic body habitus? Slighter version of sthenic; less athletic or strong pg. 81
What is an asthenic body habitus? Smallest/slightest; Frail looking, slender, and slight. The chest is long and viscera are quite low and medial pg. 81
What is the most important way to reduce involuntary motion? Use the shortest possible exposure time pg. 87
What are the functions of the skeletal system? Support, reservoir for minerals, muscle attachment/movement, protection, hematopoiesis pg. 91
What are the characteristics of synarthotic joints? Immovable; Also, they are fibrous articulations since fibrous tissue connects the bony contiguous surfaces. Ex. sutures of the cranium pg. 91
What are the characteristics of amphiarthrotic joints? Cartilaginous and partially movable; Ex interverterbral joints, symphysis pubis pg. 91
What are the characteristics of diarthrotic joints? Synovial and freely movable; majority of human articulations Ex. gliding (plane), pivot (trochoid), hinge (ginglymus), ball and socket (spheroid), condyloid (ellipsoid), and saddle (sellar) pg. 92
What is hematopoiesis? The production of blood cells; red bone marrow is very important in this process pg. 91
What are the structures included/best seen on an oblique hand? Oblique projection carpals, metacarpals, phalanges, and their articultations; use of a finger sponge places the joints parallel to the IR and opens joint spaces pg. 102
What are the structures seen on a PA semi-pronation oblique wrist? To see the scaphoid and for other lateral carpals, such as the trapezium and trapezoid, and interspaces pg. 103
What are the structures seen on an AP semiarm supination oblique wrist? To see the pisiform, region triquetrum, and hamate medial carpals and interspaces pg. 103
What are the structures seen on a carpal canal (Gaynor-Hart) wrist? Carpal canal (tunnel); trapezium, scaphoid, capitate, triquetrum, and pisiform pg. 103
What are the structures seen on a scaphoid (Stecher) wrist? Scaphoid without foreshortening and self-superimposition pg. 103
What are the structures seen on an AP elbow? Elbow joint, proximal radius and ulna, distal humerus, and the radial head and tuberosity are partially superimposed on ulna pg. 105
What are the structures seen on a lateral elbow? Lateral elbow joint, proximal radius, and ulna and distal humerus; radial head is partially super imposed on ulna and the olecranon process is in profile pg. 105
What are the structures seen on an internal medial oblique elbow? Oblique elbow joint with the coronoid process in profile pg. 105
What are the structures seen on an external lateral oblique elbow? Oblique elbow joint with the radial head, neck, and tuberosity free from superimposition of ulna pg. 105
What are the structures seen on a trauma axial lateral (Coyle) elbow? The radial head and the coronoid process pg. 105
What is a greenstick fracture? A break of cortex on one side of bone only, most often found in infants and children pg. 131
What is a torus/buckle fracture? A greenstick fracture with one cortex buckled/compacted and the other is intact pg. 131
What is a stress/fatigue fracture? A response to repeated strong force to the bone pg. 131
What is an avulsion fracture? A small bony fragment pulled from bony prominence as a result of forceful pull of the attached ligament or tendon (chip fracture) pg. 131
What is a butterfly fracture? A comminuted fracture with one or more wedge or butterfly wing-shaped pieces pg. 131
What are the five major peritoneal folds? Greater omentum, lesser omentum, mesentery, and mesocolon pg. 179
What are the salivary glands and their ducts? Parotid-Stenson duct Submandibular-Wharton duct Sublingual-Bartholin duct pg. 179
What are the GI tract tissue layers listed from inner to outer most? Mucosa Submucosa Muscular Serosa pg. 179
What arteries branch from the ascending aorta? Left and Right coronary arteries pg. 204
What arteries make up the lower extremities? Internal iliac External iliac Femoral Popliteal Anterior tibial and posterior tibial Dorsalis pedis, peroneal/fibular, medial, and lateral plantar pg.205
Created by: cfdishon