Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove Ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Wound dresssings

QuestionAnswer
Venous Insufficiency wound Draining pressure ulcer 1st and 2nd degree burns Semipermeable foam (Allevyn) P/C Nonadhesive foams should be used on patients with fragile skin; Use skin sealant to prevent maceration CI: Dry or eschar-covered wounds; arterial ulcers; heel ulcers
CI/PC for Venous Insufficiency wound Concomitant arterial disease Allergic reactions and sensitization Inappropriate whirlpool use
Rationsle for use of semipermeable foam dressing on draining wound VI wound is draining and must absorb some of the drainage and maintain a warm moist environment. Too much drainage can result of periwound maceration and create a larger wound, so it needs to be controlled by using a semipermeable foam dressing.
CI/PC for pressure ulcer Control pressure and sheer forces Control moisture to prevent maceration Make sure it is hydrated
Arterial Insufficiency Non-draining pressure ulcer Hydrogel P/C Use skin sealant to prevent maceration; time the sheet hydrogel to the size of the wound CI: Do not use on heavily drainining wounds; bleeding wounds; sheet hydrogels on infected wounds; Gauze (telfa)
Rationale for use of hydrogel Hyrdogel provide a dry wound bed with moisture. Facilitates normal wound healing. Traps enzymes within the wound bed, facilitating autolytic debridement. Preserves growth factors, cytokines, promote cell growth, fibroblast prolif & collagen synthesis
CI/PC for arterial insufficiency ulcers Avoid compression and compression dressings Avoid sharp debridement of dry, eschar-covered, uninfected ulcers in patient with low ABIs Grangrenous tissue must be removed surgically
Neuropathic Ulcer Semipermeable foam (Allevyn) P/C Nonadhesive foams should be used on patients with fragile skin; Use skin sealant to prevent maceration CI: Dry or eschar-covered wounds; arterial ulcers; heel ulcers
Raationale for use of Allyvn on Neuropathic Ulcer Maintain a moist environment to Facilitate normal wound healing. Traps enzymes within the wound bed, facilitating autolytic debridement. Preserves growth factors, cytokines, promote cell growth, fibroblast prolif & collagen synthesis
CI/PC for Neuropathic Ulcer Monitor signs for hypoglycemia Educate foot guidelines proper foot wear
Burns CI/PC Prevent complications Contractions, infections, deconditioning, pulmonary dysfunction, pressure ulcers; Do not allow burn surfaces to touch one another, protect from friction
Burns 3rd degree Impregnated Gauze Dressing (Adaptic) P/C Venous insufficiency ulcers
Rationale for adaptic on 3 degree burns Help decrease trauma to wound bed during dressing changes, increase occlusiveness of gauze dressing
PC/CI telfa Tefla used for superficial, non-draining wounds closed by primary or secondary intention, so do not use on more significant wounds may cause maceration and larger wound size
Created by: ckdabne