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gcse science C4 - G

specific for ocr gateway additonal science B.

QuestionAnswer
what are the three forms of carbon? -diamond -graphite -buckiminster fullerine
what is the name given to different forms of the same element? allotrope
what is diamond used for and why? - cutting tools as its very hard -jewellery as its very lustrous
what is the bonding of diamond like? -each carbon atom has 4 strong covalent bonds to other carbon atoms -it has a tetrahedral shape -has a giant covalent structure
why does diamond have a high melting point? lots of strong covalent bonds which need to be broken
why doesn't diamond conduct electricity? has no free electrons
why is diamond hard? -has lots of strong covalent bonds -is in a strong covalent structure
what is graphite used for and why? -pencil leads as its slippery -lubricants as its slippery -electrode as it conducts electricity and has a high melting point
what is the bonding in graphite like? -each carbon atom is bonded to 3 carbon atoms by covalent bonding -it has a delocalised electron inbetween the layers -weak intermolecular forces
why does graphite conduct electricity? the delocalised electron is able to move and pick up a current
why is graphite slippery? has weak intermolecular forces between the layers, which allows them to slide easily over each other
why does graphite have a high melting point? there are many strong covalent bonds to break
what is the shape of buckminster fullerine like? hollow ball of carbon atoms
what name is given to hollow balls of carbon atoms? nanotubes
what are nanotubes used for and why? -semiconductors in electrical circuits -industrial catalysts, large surface area so more chance of reactants colliding with catalyst -reinforce graphite in tennis rackets -cages to trap or transport other molecules, as they have large surface areas
what does nanoscale mean? dealing with individual particles
what is the difference between nano properties and bulk properties? -nano properties act differently in a tiny amount -bulk properties are the normal properties of large amounts of material
what is the name given to different forms of the same element?
what is diamond used for and why? - cutting tools as its very hard -jewellery as its very lustrous
what is the bonding of diamond like? -each carbon atom has 4 strong covalent bonds to other carbon atoms -it has a tetrahedral shape -has a giant covalent structure
why is diamond hard? -has lots of strong covalent bonds -is in a strong covalent structure
-pencil leads as its slippery -lubricants as its slippery -electrode as it conducts electricity and has a high melting point
what is the bonding in graphite like? -each carbon atom is bonded to 3 carbon atoms by covalent bonding -it has a delocalised electron inbetween the layers -weak intermolecular forces
the delocalised electron is able to move and pick up a current
why is graphite slippery? has weak intermolecular forces between the layers, which allows them to slide easily over each other
why does graphite have a high melting point? there are many strong covalent bonds to break
what name is given to hollow balls of carbon atoms? nanotubes
-semiconductors in electrical circuits -industrial catalysts, large surface area so more chance of reactants colliding with catalyst -reinforce graphite in tennis rackets -cages to trap or transport other molecules, as they have large surface areas
what does nanoscale mean?
what is the difference between nano properties and bulk properties? -nano properties act differently in a tiny amount -bulk properties are the normal properties of large amounts of material
what are the three forms of carbon? -diamond -graphite -buckiminster fullerine
what is the name given to different forms of the same element? allotrope
what is diamond used for and why? - cutting tools as its very hard -jewellery as its very lustrous
what is the bonding of diamond like? -each carbon atom has 4 strong covalent bonds to other carbon atoms -it has a tetrahedral shape -has a giant covalent structure
why does diamond have a high melting point? lots of strong covalent bonds which need to be broken
why doesn't diamond conduct electricity? has no free electrons
why is diamond hard?
what is graphite used for and why? -pencil leads as its slippery -lubricants as its slippery -electrode as it conducts electricity and has a high melting point
what is the bonding in graphite like?
the delocalised electron is able to move and pick up a current
why is graphite slippery? has weak intermolecular forces between the layers, which allows them to slide easily over each other
why does graphite have a high melting point?
hollow ball of carbon atoms
nanotubes
what are nanotubes used for and why? -semiconductors in electrical circuits -industrial catalysts, large surface area so more chance of reactants colliding with catalyst -reinforce graphite in tennis rackets -cages to trap or transport other molecules, as they have large surface areas
what does nanoscale mean? dealing with individual particles
Created by: jirwin