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Honors Chem Ch 4

orbital a region of space around the nucleus where the probability of finding an electron is high
Noble Gas shortcut notation a way of showing electron configuration that starts with the previous noble gas and continues until the desired atom is reached
Aufbau the rule that states that you must fill orbitals of lower energy before filling orbitals of higher energy
Hund's rule orbitals of equal energy are filled separately, then double up as needed
Pauli exclusion principle no two electrons can have the same "address" so we use one up arrow and one down arrow for electrons in the same orbital
orbital notation a way of showing the location of electrons by using arrows in boxes or on lines
electron configuration a way of showing the arrangement of electrons in an atom such as 1s2 2s2 2p5 for fluorine
valence electrons electrons in the highest (outermost) energy level (shell) that can be involved in forming chemical bonds
s orbital a spherical shaped orbital that can hold two electrons
p orbital a bowtie shaped orbital: three of these can hold two electrons each (total of 6 electrons)
Created by: kost