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Organic Chem. Quiz 2

TermDefinition
Combined Gas Law P1V1=P2V2/ T1(K)=T2(k)
The only source of attraction between atoms & Nonpolar molecules is? London Dispersion Force
What is London Dispersion Forces? Every atom/ molecule Exhibits. Split Second of polarization. Strength increases as mass increases.
Dalton's Law of Partial Pressure Formula PT= P1+P2+P3
What is Dalton's Law of Pressure? The total pressure (PT) of a mixture of gases is the sum of the partial pressure (P), of each in individual gas.
Small molecules = More energy
Large molecules = Less Energy
Intermolecular Forces Strength between molecules determines whether any sample of matter is a gas, liquid, or solid. Attraction between molecules.
What are the 3 types of intermolecular forces? London Dispersion Forces Dipole- Dipole Hydrogen Bonds
What is a Dipole Dipole interaction? The electrostatic attraction between positive and negative dipoles.
Hydrogen bonds A type of Dipole-Dipole. involves a H to an O/N. Strength in #'s. Increase boiling point & heat separates bonds.
Liquids Very little space between molecules. Density is greater than gas because molecules occupy smaller volume. Molecules have irregular shape between them.
Surface Tension The layer on the surface of a liquid produced by intermolecular attractions at it's surface.
Boiling point factors The nature 7 strength of intermolecular forces. Molecular size & shape. The more surface area it has the more temp. needed to boil.
Molecular Shape When molecules are similar in every way except shape, the strength of its london forces determines it's boiling point.
Gas Pressure is Measured In? ATM, Atmospheres
What is Gas Pressure? Measures the force; Hitting sides of wall. Pressure is force per unit area exerted against a surface.
Boyle's Law A Constant Temp. The volume of a gas is inversely proportional to the pressure.
Volume increases then pressure goes down. Vise Versa Boyle's Law
Keeping temp. Constant Boyle's Law
Charles's Law Holds Pressure Constant For a fixed volume of gas at a constant pressure, the volume is directly proportional to the temp. in Kelvins. (273)
Temp. increases pressure increases Charles's Law
Holds Pressure Constant Charles's Law
Gay- Lussac's Law Holds Volume Constant. A gas at constant volume, the pressure is directly proportional to the temp. in kelvin. (273)
Temp. increase pressure increases Gay-Lussac's Law
Holds Volume Constant Gay-Lussac's Law
Homogeneous Uniform Solution (Sea Water, Air)
Heterogeneous Not combined on molecular level. (Sand + Sugar)
Solvent The Largest Fraction of a solution in which the other components are dissolved.
Solute A substance that is dissolved in a solvent.
Miscible When 2 liquids are completely soluble in each other, no matter the amount. Polar + Polar/ nonpolar + nonpolar
Solubility max.amount of a solute that dissolves in q
Created by: Allison5811