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FOCA_7.2

Vocabulary for FOCA_7.2

TermDefinition
independent events Two events, A and B, are independent if the fact that A occurs does not affect the probability of B occurring. Some other examples of independent events are: Landing on heads after tossing a coin AND rolling a 5 on a single 6-sided die.
dependent events Two events are dependent if the outcome or occurrence of the first affects the outcome or occurrence of the second so that the probability is changed.
mutually exclusive Two events (or propositions) are mutually exclusive or disjoint if they cannot both occur (be true). A clear example is the set of outcomes of a single coin toss, which can result in either heads or tails, but not both.
disjoint Two events (or propositions) are mutually exclusive or disjoint if they cannot both occur (be true). A clear example is the set of outcomes of a single coin toss, which can result in either heads or tails, but not both.
union The union of two sets is everything in both sets. For example, if you have the set {3,4,5} and the set {5,6,7}, then the union of these two sets is {3,4,5,6,7}. The symbol for union is a capital U.
intersection The intersection A ∩ B of two sets A and B is the set that contains all elements of A that also belong to B (or equivalently, all elements of B that also belong to A), but no other elements.
conditional probability The probability of an event occurring given that another event has occurred. Written P(B|A), it reads as the probability of event B occurring if A occurs. For example, when rolling two dice the probability of getting a total of three is 2/36.
two-way table A two-way table of counts organizes data about two categorical variables. Values of the row variable label the rows that run across the table, and values of the column variable label the columns that run down the table.