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chem303.s1.d49

cava chem 303 s1 4.09 Bonding in Metals

QuestionAnswer
Bronze is a mixture of [...] and [...]. We call such mixtures of metals alloys. Bronze is a mixture of copper and tin. We call such mixtures of metals alloys.
Metals must be purified from mineral [-s] found in nature. Metals must be purified from mineral ores found in nature.
An [...] is natural mixture of a metal with minerals and other impurities found within the earth. An ore is natural mixture of a metal with minerals and other impurities found within the earth.
In metallic solids, a regular array of metal cations, each with a positive charge, is surrounded by a "[...]" of valence electrons that can move freely from nucleus to nucleus. In metallic solids, a regular array of metal cations, each with a positive charge, is surrounded by a "sea" of valence electrons that can move freely from nucleus to nucleus.
valence electrons in metals are free to float between metal atoms and thus are called [de-] electrons. This molecular arrangement gives metals unique properties. valence electrons in metals are free to float between metal atoms and thus are called delocalized electrons. This molecular arrangement gives metals unique properties.
Malleus is the Latin word for [...] Malleus is the Latin word for hammer
To be malleable (hammerable) means that something can be hammered or pounded into new shapes without [...] (as metals can) To be malleable (hammerable) means that something can be hammered or pounded into new shapes without breaking (as metals can)
Ionic solids tend to be [...] because ionic bonds hold the ions together rigidly. On the other hand, metallic solids are malleable. Ionic solids tend to be brittle because ionic bonds hold the ions together rigidly. On the other hand, metallic solids are malleable.
Metals are malleable because their “sea of [...]” allows the bonds between metal atoms to adjust to moving those atoms around. Metals are malleable because their “sea of electrons” allows the bonds between metal atoms to adjust to moving those atoms around.
“Because of the [...]” is the answer to pretty much all questions about metallic properties “Because of the sea of electrons” is the answer to pretty much all questions about metallic properties
A duct is a channel or wire. To be [-ile] means something can be pulled into wires. A duct is a channel or wire. To be ductile means something can be pulled into wires.
The “[...]” explains why metals are ductile. The electrons that bond metal atoms together can move around freely to accommodate moving the atoms around. The “sea of electrons” explains why metals are ductile. The electrons that bond metal atoms together can move around freely to accommodate moving the atoms around.
Metals generally have high melting points… because of (you guessed it) their [...], which tend to hold them together tightly. (not always; Mercury has a low melting point) Metals generally have high melting points… because of (you guessed it) their sea of electrons, which tend to hold them together tightly. (not always; Mercury has a low melting point)
Metals conduct electricity and heat well because…. [drum roll] of the [...], which can carry energy from one place in the metal to another. Metals conduct electricity and heat well because…. [drum roll] of the sea of electrons, which can carry energy from one place in the metal to another.
Metals can be mixed together, usually at high temperatures, to produce metal [-s] which have slightly different properties than the individual metals that make them up. Metals can be mixed together, usually at high temperatures, to produce metal alloys which have slightly different properties than the individual metals that make them up.
Sterling silver is mostly silver with a little bit of [...]… this makes it more durable than pure silver. Sterling silver is mostly silver with a little bit of copper… this makes it more durable than pure silver.
Steel is an interesting allow of a metal (iron) with a non-metal ([...]). We’re not sure how people discovered this, but medieval blacksmiths made steel by pounding coal into hot iron. Steel is an interesting allow of a metal (iron) with a non-metal (carbon). We’re not sure how people discovered this, but medieval blacksmiths made steel by pounding coal into hot iron.
brittle = [...] brittle = breaking or shattering easily
Created by: mr.shapard