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chem303.s1d25

cava chem 303 s1 2.11 the Bohr Atom

QuestionAnswer
J.J. [...] suggested a "plum pudding model" for the atom. In this model, negatively charged electrons were swimming in a sea of positive charges J.J. Thomson suggested a "plum pudding model" for the atom. In this model, negatively charged electrons were swimming in a sea of positive charges
Ernest [...], with his gold-foil experiments, confirmed that there was a centralized nucleus. Ernest Rutherford, with his gold-foil experiments, confirmed that there was a centralized nucleus.
Niels Bohr was a student of [...]'s in the early 1900s. Niels Bohr was a student of Rutherford's in the early 1900s.
In 1913, Bohr changed the model of the atom. Most of his changes were based on new ideas about how atoms absorb or give off [...]. In 1913, Bohr changed the model of the atom. Most of his changes were based on new ideas about how atoms absorb or give off light.
Bohr suggested that electrons are found in [...] paths around the nucleus. Bohr suggested that electrons are found in distinct paths around the nucleus.
Bohr's model confines an electron to a distinct orbit around the nucleus. Each of these orbits is a certain distance away from the nucleus; electrons in the orbits farther from the nucleus have [...] energy than those closer to the nucleus. Bohr's model confines an electron to a distinct orbit around the nucleus. Each of these orbits is a certain distance away from the nucleus; electrons in the orbits farther from the nucleus have more energy than those closer to the nucleus.
The distinct orbital pathways of electrons are called [...] in chemistry. The distinct orbital pathways of electrons are called orbitals in chemistry.
Nowadays, orbitals (electron pathways) are grouped into shells and subshells. Unfortunately, people (K12 included) sometimes get sloppy and refer to shells or subshells as [...]… sorry. Nowadays, orbitals (electron pathways) are grouped into shells and subshells. Unfortunately, people (K12 included) sometimes get sloppy and refer to shells or subshells as orbitals… sorry.
In Bohr's model, electrons have a certain, set amount of [...]. In Bohr's model, electrons have a certain, set amount of energy.
An orbital SHELL is also called an [...] level. Within that shell are subshells and within those subshells are orbitals (the actual pathways of electrons). An orbital SHELL is also called an energy level. Within that shell are subshells and within those subshells are orbitals (the actual pathways of electrons).
in the Bohr atom each electron is at a specific or discrete distance from the nucleus. Each resides in one of a series of fixed [...] around the nucleus. in the Bohr atom each electron is at a specific or discrete distance from the nucleus. Each resides in one of a series of fixed orbits around the nucleus.
Electrons in a Bohr atom exist at specific energy levels. They cannot reside [...] energy levels. Electrons in a Bohr atom exist at specific energy levels. They cannot reside between energy levels.
Generally speaking, electrons residing in orbitals closer to the nucleus are at a [...] energy level. Electrons in orbitals farther from the nucleus are at a [...] energy level Generally speaking, electrons residing in orbitals closer to the nucleus are at a lower energy level. Electrons in orbitals farther from the nucleus are at a higher energy level
It is possible for an electron to change orbitals, or energy levels. But that change has to be a very specific change. An electron would have to gain or lose exactly the right amount of [...] It is possible for an electron to change orbitals, or energy levels. But that change has to be a very specific change. An electron would have to gain or lose exactly the right amount of energy
For an electron to move farther from the nucleus, it must [...] energy. For an electron to move farther from the nucleus, it must absorb energy.
Chloroplasts absorb energy from sunlight, causing [...] to move to higher orbitals within the plant cells. Chloroplasts absorb energy from sunlight, causing electrons to move to higher orbitals within the plant cells.
For an electron to move closer to the nucleus, it must [...] energy. For an electron to move closer to the nucleus, it must release energy.
The light given off by fireflies is the result of electrons emitting energy (as light) as they move to [...] energy levels. This is also how lightbulbs work. The light given off by fireflies is the result of electrons emitting energy (as light) as they move to lower energy levels. This is also how lightbulbs work.
One way to talk about the energy needed to move an electron from one level to another is to refer to a [q-] of energy. A [q-] is a discrete amount of energy. One way to talk about the energy needed to move an electron from one level to another is to refer to a quantum of energy. A quantum is a discrete amount of energy.
You may have heard the expression quantum leap used to refer to a sudden or discrete change. That expression comes from the Bohr model in which electrons jump to one level of energy or another but nowhere in [...]. You may have heard the expression quantum leap used to refer to a sudden or discrete change. That expression comes from the Bohr model in which electrons jump to one level of energy or another but nowhere in between.
A valence electron is any electron located in the [-most] electron SHELL. A valence electron is any electron located in the outermost electron SHELL.
The valence electrons are the ones that interact or are transferred to other atoms during chemical reactions because (duh) they are the ones that come into contact with the [...] world. The valence electrons are the ones that interact or are transferred to other atoms during chemical reactions because (duh) they are the ones that come into contact with the outside world.
The valence electrons are the electrons in the [...]-most electron SHELL. The valence electrons are the electrons in the outer-most electron SHELL.
Created by: mr.shapard