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chem303.s1.d05

cava chem 303 s1 1.06 Mixtures

QuestionAnswer
Homo- = [...] Homo- = same
Hetero- = [...] Hetero- = different
[...] = We use this word to refer to mixtures that LOOK like they are all one substance. For example, milk looks like it’s all just a white substance, but it’s actually lots of things mixed together. Homogenous (home–ODJ-enus)= We use this word to refer to mixtures that LOOK like they are all one substance. For example, milk looks like it’s all just a white substance, but it’s actually lots of things mixed together.
[...] = A mixture that LOOKS like one. You can SEE that it’s made of different things (e.g. chicken soup; you can see noodles and chunks of chicken) Heterogenous (heter-ODJ-enus) = A mixture that LOOKS like one. You can SEE that it’s made of different things (e.g. chicken soup; you can see noodles and chunks of chicken)
IGNORE K12’s definition of homogenous and heterogenous. The only thing that matters is what the mixture [...] like; not how evenly distributed the molecules are IGNORE K12’s definition of homogenous and heterogenous. The only thing that matters is what the mixture LOOKS like; not how evenly distributed the molecules are
Chemists separate [-s] by taking advantage of different physical properties of substances. Chemists separate mixtures by taking advantage of different physical properties of substances.
[-tion] can be used to separate a mixture if the particles have different sizes. (in practice, [...] works best for larger solid particles in a liquid… think coffee grinds in water) Filtration can be used to separate a mixture if the particles have different sizes. (in practice, filtration works best for larger solid particles in a liquid… think coffee grinds in water)
Distillation separates mixtures on the basis of [...] differences (one substance [...] away, leaving the others behind) Distillation separates mixtures on the basis of boiling point differences (one substance boils away, leaving the others behind)
Simple Distillation isolates [#] substance(s) from the rest of the mixture. Simple Distillation isolates one substance from the rest of the mixture.
Fractional Distillation isolates [...] from a mixture… this is commonly done to separate crude oil into different kinds of natural gases and oils. Fractional Distillation isolates several substances from a mixture… this is commonly done to separate crude oil into different kinds of natural gases and oils.
A fraction is a [...] of the whole. A fraction is a part of the whole.
Fractional distillation separates out [...] (fractions) from the whole. Fractional distillation separates out several ‘parts’ (fractions) from the whole.
Chromatography is a separation technique based on the [...] that parts of a mixture move through other substances. Chromatography is a separation technique based on the rate that parts of a mixture move through other substances.
In chromatography, the different parts of a mixture run an obstacle race. The smaller they are, the [-er] they move through the obstacles… this is how you separate them. In chromatography, the different parts of a mixture run an obstacle race. The smaller they are, the faster they move through the obstacles… this is how you separate them.
Chromato- = [...] Chromato- = color
-graphy = [...] -graphy = drawing/graphing
Chromato-graphy (croma-TOG-rafy) got its name from the fact that it often creates a slip of paper with different [-ed] substances on it. Chromato-graphy (croma-TOG-rafy) got its name from the fact that it often creates a slip of paper with different colored substances on it.
In chromatography, the [...] phase is the obstacle course that substances run through. It doesn’t move (that’s what [...] means). In chromatography, the stationary phase is the obstacle course that substances run through. It doesn’t move (that’s what stationary means).
In paper chromatography (which we do in the unit 1 lab), paper is the [...] phase; chemicals run through it, not the other way around. In paper chromatography (which we do in the unit 1 lab), paper is the stationary phase; chemicals run through it, not the other way around.
In chromatography, substances usually don’t run through the stationary obstacle course on their own; instead, they’re sort of carried along by water or some other liquid (or gas). In that case, the liquid or gas is the [...] phase because it moves. In chromatography, substances usually don’t run through the stationary obstacle course on their own; instead, they’re sort of carried along by water or some other liquid (or gas). In that case, the liquid or gas is the mobile phase because it moves.
Paper chromatography has [...] as its stationary phase. Paper chromatography has paper as its stationary phase.
In chromatography, the mobile phase can be a [...] or a gas. In chromatography, the mobile phase can be a liquid or a gas.
In liquid chromatography, the mobile phase is a [...] and the stationary phase is a [...]. In liquid chromatography, the mobile phase is a liquid and the stationary phase is a liquid.
In gas chromatography, the mobile phase is a [...] and the stationary phase is a [...]. In gas chromatography, the mobile phase is a gas and the stationary phase is a gas.
A centrifuge is a device that separates mixtures on the basis of [...]. It spins around very fast, and the denser particles sink to the bottom. A centrifuge is a device that separates mixtures on the basis of density. It spins around very fast, and the denser particles sink to the bottom.
To separate blood cells from plasma, a technician can centrifuge the blood samples at low speeds. The blood cells are [-er] and will settle to the bottom. To separate blood cells from plasma, a technician can centrifuge the blood samples at low speeds. The blood cells are denser and will settle to the bottom.
In chromatography, the mobile phase can be a liquid or a [...]. In chromatography, the mobile phase can be a liquid or a gas.
Created by: mr.shapard