Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove Ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Chem. Sem. 1 - Boren

A review of concepts, equations, and skills for Semester 1 of Chemistry.

QuestionAnswer
6.02 × 10²³ of something. It could be this many atoms, ions, or molecules. a mole
A measure of how strongly an atom holds onto its own electrons. Also how strongly it will try to take electrons from other atoms. electronegativity
A positively charged particle in the nucleus of an atom. proton
A particle in the nucleus of an atom that has no charge. neutron
A negatively charged particle that moves very quickly around the nucleus of an atom in clouds or orbitals. electron
The units that we usually use in measuring the mass of a substance in a Chemistry class – using a balance or scale. grams, g
The units that we usually use in measuring the volume of a substance in a Chemistry class – using a graduated cylinder. milliliters, mL
A horizontal row on the periodic table. The elements in it have increasing atomic numbers. period
A vertical column on the periodic table. The elements in it have usually have similar electron configurations and chemical properties. group
The number of protons that an element has. This is usually found at the top of an element's box on the periodic table. atomic number
The weighted average of the number of protons and neutrons of an element. This is usually found at the bottom of an element's box on the periodic table. average atomic mass
The outer electrons of an atom. Usually the number next to the A on top of the group. valence electrons
An atom that has lost or gained valence electrons giving it a net positive or negative electric charge. ion
An atom with the usual number of protons in their nucleus, but different numbers of neutrons. isotope
An atom that gained a positive electric charge by losing valence electrons. Usually formed from metal atoms. cation
An atom that gained a negative electric charge by gaining valence electrons. Usually formed from nonmetal atoms. anion
A compound formed from two different types of metal elements. metallic compound
A compound usually formed from a metal and a nonmetal element. They reach a more stable electron configuration by exchanging electrons. ionic compound
A compound usually formed from two different nonmetal elements. They reach a more stable electron configuration by sharing electrons. covalent compound
The elements in group 1A. These are highly reactive in their elemental state because they are located next to the noble gases. These include lithium, sodium, and potassium. alkali metals
The elements in group 7A. These are highly reactive in their elemental state because they are located next to the noble gases. These include fluorine, chlorine, and bromine. halogens
The elements in group 8A. These are stable and mostly unreactive because of their complete electron configurations. These include helium, neon, and argon. noble gases
Most of the elements that lie on the periodic table's stair step. These have properties of both metals and nonmetals. They are used as semiconductors. These include silicon and arsenic. semi-metals (or metalloids)
The elements in group 2A. These are somewhat reactive in their elemental state because they are located near the noble gases. These include beryllium, magnesium, and calcium. alkaline earth metals
The elements that are found at the bottom of the periodic table but really fit in between the transition metals. These include the lanthanide series and the actinide series. rare earth metals
The elements that are found between the alkaline earth metals and the post-transition metals on the periodic table. They often have multiple possible ionic charges. These include iron, copper, and tungsten. transition metals
The elements that are found between the transition metals and the metalloids on the periodic table. These include aluminum and tin. post-transition metals
A group of atoms that are held together by covalent bonds. molecule
A molecule made up of atoms that share the electrons in a covalent bond unequally due to differences in electronegativity. This results in slightly negative and positive charges being located at different parts of the molecule. polar molecule
A group of covalently bonded atoms that share a net electric charge. polyatomic ion
A material that you can write a specific chemical formula for. It can be either an element (ex. O₂) or a compound (ex. H₂O). pure substance
A material that has a variable (or changeable) ratio to it. mixture
A material that has only on type of atom (ex. O₂). element
A material that 2 or more types of atoms chemically bonded together (ex. H₂O). compound
An evenly distributed mixture with small particles (mixed at the molecular level). homogeneous mixture
An unevenly distributed mixture with large, clumpy particles. heterogeneous mixture
A process that involves the breaking and forming of chemical bonds. It often also includes the release or absorption of energy. (ex. burning, rusting) chemical change
A process that may involve a substance changing shape, changing state of matter, or going into or out from a mixture (ex. chopping wood, freezing water, or dissolving salt in water). physical change
The volume of 1 mole of gas at STP (0°C, 1 atmosphere). 22.4 L
The fact that most atoms (but not hydrogen) rearrange their valence electrons so they have EIGHT, whether by sharing or exchanging. octet rule
The mass in grams per mole (g/mol) of a substance. It is calculated by using the average atomic masses from the periodic table. molar mass
The part of an atom that occupies very little space but contains almost all of an atom's mass. nucleus
The part of an atom that has very little mass but takes up most of the space in an atom. electron cloud (or electron orbitals)
How the number of moles of one reactant or product from a balanced chemical equation compare to the moles of a different reactant or product. mole ratio
The substances that we start with in a chemical reaction (aka the ingredients). reactants
The substances that are produced by a chemical reaction. products
The reactant that is used up first and determines how much of the products can be made. limiting reactant
The reactant that is not used up completely in a chemical reaction. There are left overs of this reactant. excess reactant
Created by: john.boren