Busy. Please wait.
or

show password
Forgot Password?

Don't have an account?  Sign up 
or

Username is available taken
show password

why


Make sure to remember your password. If you forget it there is no way for StudyStack to send you a reset link. You would need to create a new account.
We do not share your email address with others. It is only used to allow you to reset your password. For details read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.


Already a StudyStack user? Log In

Reset Password
Enter the associated with your account, and we'll email you a link to reset your password.

Remove ads
Don't know
Know
remaining cards
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the "Know" box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the "Don't know" box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

"Know" box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards




share
Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

GCSE3 sustainability

AQA GCSE chapter 14 Materials and sustainability

QuestionAnswer
What are the 5 stages to make ground water potable for our homes? Screen; Settle; Sulfate; Chlorine; pH
What does flocculation mean? when fine particulates are caused to clump together into a floc
Why is Aluminium Sulfate added during water treatment? to help small particles to clump together
What is sedimentation? settling of sediments
What is the job of the filtration tank? to remove grains of sands and other sediments
What is the job of Lime? to adjust the pH so that the water is not too acidic (otherwise, the water could corrode the pipes)
What is the job of Aluminium Sulfate? to help particles come together
What is the job of Activated Carbon? to remove organic particles that could cause a smell
What is the job of Chlorine? to kill bacteria
What methods can be used to kill bacteria? Chlorine, UV light, Ozone
What are the two principles behind “sustainability”? Future generation need to be able to access the resources; There must be no pollution left for future generations
Why are paper cups not an environmentally friendly option for drinking coffee? because they are coated in plastics
What is a finite resource? A resource that will run out
Give two examples of finite resources crude oil and metal ores
What is a renewable resource? A resource that can be grown/harvested again very quickly
Why would the production of glass have a worse score than the production of plastic? because a lot of energy is needed to melt the raw materials, much more than to make plastic
CHALLENGE: Why is the LCA not so reliable? Judgements have to be made: about the data needed, the validity of the data available, the weighting to be given to each of the 4 factors and the overall assessment. This means different people can come to different conclusions from the same data.
What are the 5 stages in the LCA? extraction, production, transport, use and disposal of a product
What is the Life Cycle Assessment? The assessment of the environmental impact of a product at each stage of its life
What are the 4 factors that determine the score at each stage of the LCA? energy use; type of resources used (finite or not); water and carbon dioxide emissions
State a few advantages of recycling saves (finite) resources; less spoiling of environment by mining/quarrying; less waste from mining; (some) metals do not break down so fewer landfills needed; copper waste toxic; requires less energy than mining+extracting; Less dust, noise, CO2 emissions
State some limitations of recycling Sorting; Copper often alloyed with other metals and can only be separated using electrolysis if high concentration of copper
What is an ore? a rock that contains enough metal compound to make it economical to extract
What is a low grade ore? a rock that contains some metal compound but not quite enough to make it economical to extract
Why could the same rock be class as an ore in Zambia (Africa) but as a low grade ore in the UK? Labour is probably cheaper in Zambia, so it is economically viable to extract; labour is more expensive in the UK and therefore no profit would be made
What is the charge on a copper ion? +2
During the electrolysis of Copper Sulfate, Which electrode will gain mass? the negative electrode (aka cathode)
During the electrolysis of Copper Sulfate, Which electrode will lose mass? the positive electrode (aka anode)
Describe what happens to the copper ions at the cathode (the negative electrode) the copper IONS picks up two electrons to become copper ATOMS (you must use the correct particles keywords)
Describe what happens to the copper atoms at the anode (the negative electrode) the copper ATOMS loses two electrons to become copper IONS (you must use the correct particles keywords)
What is the sludge under the anode? the impurities left behind when the copper ATOMS from the impure copper electrode dissolved
CHALLENGE: why does the concentration stay the same in the electrolytic cell? there are as many copper atoms that go into solution at the anode, than copper ions that become atoms at the cathode
Describe the process of phytomining Plants are grown about low grade ores; plants absorb copper ions; after the plant is harvested, it is burned; the ashes are reacted with sulfuric acid and the copper sulfate is electrolysed
Describe what bioleaching is In bioleaching, metal ores are dissolved in a solution then mixed with certain bacteria. Depending on the type of bacteria, different metals will be ‘leached’ from the ores into the solution, ready for electrolysis or a displacement reaction.
State advantages of bioleaching uses less energy than traditional extraction and does not produce waste gases; reduces the amount of waste rock; Low concentrations can be extracted
State disadvantages of bioleaching the bacterial leaching process is very slow compared to smelting.; Toxic chemicals are sometimes produced in the process. Acid is formed can leak into the ground and surface water turning it acidic. iron, zinc, and arsenic leak during acid mine drainage.
How does distillation work? Identify advantages and disadvantages Boiling the water then condensing the water. It helps remove salts and it kills microorganism; but small gases like chlorine may still be found in the water.
How does reverse osmosis work? Identify advantages and disadvantages works by forcing water under pressure through a semi-permeable membrane, and filters out salts; does not need heat (less energy) but requires great pressure. requires an enormous amount of water only 10 percent of the water pushed through the system.
What is the difference between potable and drinkable water? Potable means drinkable, but it will still contain some salts (aka ions) and dissolved gases. Pure water is ONLY H2O, no salts, no gases.
Why is it bad to drink pure water? Because you need salts in your body. Pure water is a hypotonic solution. So, if you drink enough of it, your cells will start absorbing water. This disturbs the balance of ions. This is a problem in the brain, can lead to brain damage, coma, death.
During purification of copper, what are the electrodes made of? The Cathode is pure copper and the Anode is impure copper
During purification of copper, describe the reaction at the Anode Not quite NANA give up and burn... the copper ATOMS from the electrode will LOSE electrons and become copper IONS. (make sure that you write the names of the particles: ION into ATOM)
During purification of copper, describe the reaction at the Cathode The copper IONS from the solution will collect/GAIN electrons to become copper ATOMS (make sure that you write the names of the particles: ION into ATOM)
During purification of copper, why does the Cathode gain mass? because the copper IONS from the solution will collect/GAIN electrons to become copper ATOMS. More atoms = more mass. (make sure that you write the names of the particles: ION into ATOM)
During purification of copper, why does the Anode lose mass? because the copper ATOMS from the electrode will LOSE electrons to become copper IONS. (Have you used the keywords?) The ions go insolution. Less atoms=less mass
What is the sludge found under the Anode made of? Impurities from the copper anode: Silver metal
During purification of copper, why does the concentration of copper ions in solution stay the same? Because for each ION that move to the cathode to become an ATOM, an ATOM from the anode loses an electron to become an ION (make sure that you write the names of the particles: ION into ATOM)
During purification of copper, what happens to the copper ions that are in solution? The copper IONS move to the Cathode
During purification of copper, why does the Anode lose MORE mass than the Cathode gains? for each ION that becomes an ATOM at the cathode, an ATOM from the anode loses an electron to become an ION; so the mass lost and gained should be the same: the difference is the impurities found in the Anode that fall at the bottom of the beaker.
Created by: ursulinechem2