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Van der Waals Forces

CAVA chem302 303 4.14/4.15 Van der Waals Forces

QuestionAnswer
The attraction and repulsion between molecules, are called [...] forces. The attraction and repulsion between molecules, are called intermolecular forces.
Polar molecules do not share valence electrons [...-li]. Polar molecules do not share valence electrons equally.
Unequal electron sharing makes one atom partially [...] and the other partially [...]. Unequal electron sharing makes one atom partially negative and the other partially positive.
Polar molecules are sometimes called [...] because they have poles at two (di) ends. Polar molecules are sometimes called dipoles because they have poles at two (di) ends.
Opposite charges [...]; like charges [...]. Opposite charges attract; like charges repel.
A '[...] Moment' is not (as the name suggests) a moment. It's a measure of how polar a molecule is. A 'Dipole Moment' is not (as the name suggests) a moment. It's a measure of how polar a molecule is.
Forces of attraction and repulsion between polar molecules are called [...]-[...] forces. Forces of attraction and repulsion between polar molecules are called dipole-dipole forces.
Sometimes non-polar molecules become momentarily [...] because electrons just happen to be on one side. Sometimes non-polar molecules become momentarily polar because electrons just happen to be on one side.
A momentary polarity in an otherwise non-polar molecule can induce [...] in other molecules. A momentary polarity in an otherwise non-polar molecule can induce polarity in other molecules.
The force of attraction due to chance moments of polarity in one molecule (and induced polarity on other molecules) is called [...] (or [...]) force. The force of attraction due to chance moments of polarity in one molecule (and induced polarity on other molecules) is called Dispersion (or London) force.
The [...-er] the molecule, the stronger the Dispersion (aka London) Forces will be. The larger the molecule, the stronger the Dispersion (aka London) Forces will be.
Wax is an example of a large non-polar molecule held together entirely by [...] forces. Wax is an example of a large non-polar molecule held together entirely by Dispersion (aka London) forces.
[...] forces explain why a gecko's feet stick to glass (and other surfaces), and how they can walk on the ceiling. Dispersion (aka London) forces explain why a gecko's feet stick to glass (and other surfaces), and how they can walk on the ceiling.
[...] forces explain why some halogens are liquid or solid at room temperature. Dispersion (aka London) forces explain why some halogens are liquid or solid at room temperature.
'[...] bonds' form between hydrogen atoms and partially negative atoms on adjacent molecules. Hydrogen bonds' form between hydrogen atoms and partially negative atoms on adjacent molecules.
Hydrogen bonds explain why water [...] when it freezes. Hydrogen bonds explain why water expands when it freezes.
Hydrogen bonds create surface [...] in liquid water. Hydrogen bonds create surface tension in liquid water.
dipole-dipole, dispersion, and hydrogen bond forces are collectively called [...] forces. dipole-dipole, dispersion, and hydrogen bond forces are collectively called Van de Waals forces.
Dipoles can also stick to ions. We call the forces of attraction here [...]-[...] forces. Dipoles can also stick to ions. We call the forces of attraction here ion-dipole forces.
Even though chemists have all these names for different Van der Waals forces, these are ALL just examples of electrostatic force: the attraction between [...] electrical charges (and repulsion of [...] charges) Even though chemists have all these names for different Van der Waals forces, these are ALL just examples of electrostatic force: the attraction between opposite electrical charges (and repulsion of like charges)
Created by: mr.shapard