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S1U2 Atomic Spectra

CAVA Chem 303 S1U2 Atomic Spectra

QuestionAnswer
When an atom [...] energy, an electron can move from a lower energy state to a higher energy state. When an atom absorbs energy, an electron can move from a lower energy state to a higher energy state.
When the electrons of an atom [...] the right amount of energy, they can move from a lower energy state to a higher one. When the electrons of an atom absorb the right amount of energy, they can move from a lower energy state to a higher one.
when the electrons of an atom [...] energy, they may fall from a higher energy state to a lower one releasing energy; often in the form of light. when the electrons of an atom lose energy, they may fall from a higher energy state to a lower one releasing energy; often in the form of light.
Often the energy given off when electrons fall from a high energy state to a low state is in the form of [...]. Often the energy given off when electrons fall from a high energy state to a low state is in the form of light.
Often the energy given off when [...] fall from a high energy orbital to a low orbital is in the form of light. Often the energy given off when electrons fall from a high energy orbital to a low orbital is in the form of light.
The amount of energy released when an electron falls to a lower energy level can be calculated with [...]'s equation. The amount of energy released when an electron falls to a lower energy level can be calculated with Planck's equation.
Planck's equation is: [...] (Ernie hates Velveeta) Planck's equation is: E = hv (Ernie hates Velveeta)
In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = [...]; v = frequency of light (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = Planck's constant In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = energy; v = frequency of light (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = Planck's constant
An atomic [...] spectrum is a snapshot of how an atom releases energy. An atomic emission spectrum is a snapshot of how an atom releases energy.
Each different type of atom has its own unique set of electrons. Therefore, each different type of atom will create a different pattern of light (atomic [... ...]) when those electrons fall back into place after being "kicked up." Each different type of atom has its own unique set of electrons. Therefore, each different type of atom will create a different pattern of light (atomic emission spectrum) when those electrons fall back into place after being "kicked up."
No two atoms have exactly the same emission [...]. No two atoms have exactly the same emission spectrum.
The atomic emission spectrum is like a [...] for identifying atoms. The atomic emission spectrum is like a fingerprint for identifying atoms.
The uniqueness of each atom's emission [...] has many applications. The uniqueness of each atom's emission spectrum has many applications.
Astronomers may analyze the light coming from a distant star, and pinpoint the [... ... ...] given off. They can then determine the composition of the star by reading those colored lines that make up the spectrum. Astronomers may analyze the light coming from a distant star, and pinpoint the atomic emission spectra given off. They can then determine the composition of the star by reading those colored lines that make up the spectrum.
Scientists use atomic emission spectra to discover the elements in samples of [...] materials. Scientists use atomic emission spectra to discover the elements in samples of unknown materials.
Conversely, scientists can see how a material [*not emits*] light. Chemists can then use this data to identify the material that they are looking at. Conversely, scientists can see how a material absorbs light. Chemists can then use this data to identify the material that they are looking at.
Flame Test: Heat a metal over a flame. The electrons will give off light. The [...] is different for each metal. Flame Test: Heat a metal over a flame. The electrons will give off light. The color is different for each metal.
Photoelectric effect: some materials, when subjected to light, actually generated [...]. Photoelectric effect: some materials, when subjected to light, actually generated electricity.
[...] described the photoelectric effect by using an understanding of how atoms emit energy. Einstein described the photoelectric effect by using an understanding of how atoms emit energy.
The phenomenon of light hitting substances and resulting in electricity is called the [...] effect. The phenomenon of light hitting substances and resulting in electricity is called the photoelectric effect.
Einstein won his only Nobel Prize for the discovery of the [...] effect. Einstein won his only Nobel Prize for the discovery of the photoelectric effect.
Einstein explained the photoelectric effect by saying that if you give enough energy to electrons, they will [... ... ... ...]; thus generating electricity. Einstein explained the photoelectric effect by saying that if you give enough energy to electrons, they will leave the atom entirely; thus generating electricity.
Electricity is the flow of electric [...]. A common form of electricity is the flow of electrons through metal. Electricity is the flow of electric charge. A common form of electricity is the flow of electrons through metal.
Electricity is the flow of electric charge. A common form of electricity is the flow of [...] through metal. Electricity is the flow of electric charge. A common form of electricity is the flow of electrons through metal.
when the electrons of an atom lose energy, they may fall from a higher energy state to a lower one releasing energy; often in the form of [...]. when the electrons of an atom lose energy, they may fall from a higher energy state to a lower one releasing energy; often in the form of light.
In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = energy; v = [...] (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = Planck's constant In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = energy; v = frequency of light (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = Planck's constant
In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = energy; v = frequency of light (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = [...] In Planck's equation ( E = hv ), E = energy; v = frequency of light (this is actually the Greek letter nu); h = Planck's constant
Created by: mr.shapard