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Writing Techniques

QuestionAnswer
Simile A figure of speech used to compare two unlike things using like, as, or than.
Slang Informal words or phrases used by a particular group of people.
Symbol A concrete object used to represent an idea.
Synecdoche Using part of something to represent the whole.
Understatement The opposite of exaggeration. By using calm language, an author can bring special attention to an object or idea.
Alliteration The repetition of the same beginning sound of several words in a sentence.
Allusion A reference to a familiar person, place, thing, or event—music, mythology, biblical, art, etc.
Anacoluthon Lack of grammatical sequence; a change in grammatical construction within the same sentence.
Anadiplosis(“doubling back”) Repetition of one or several words; specifically, repetition of a word that ends one clause and begins the next clause.
Analogy A comparison of ideas or objects that are completely different but are alike in one important way.
Anaphora The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, or lines.
Anecdote A brief story used to make a point.
Antistrophe Repetition of the same word or phrase at the end of successive clauses.
Antithesis Using opposite ideas to emphasize a point.
Apostrophe A sudden turn from the general audience to address a specific group or person or personified abstraction absent or present.
Archaism Use of an older or obsolete form.
Assonance Repetition of the same vowel sound in words close to each other.
Asyndeton Lack of conjunctions between coordinate phrases, clauses, or words.
Colloquialism A common word or phrase suitable for ordinary, everyday conversation but not for formal speech or writing.
Exaggeration An overstatement or stretching of the truth to emphasize a point.
Flashback A technique in which a writer interrupts a story to go back and explain an earlier time or event for the purpose of making something in the present more clear.
Foreshadowing Hints or clues about what will happen next in a story.
Hyperbole Exaggeration used to emphasize a point.
Irony A word or phrase in which the author says one thing but means just the opposite.
Juxtaposition Putting two words or ideas close together to create a contrasting of ideas or ironic meaning.
Litotes Understatement, for intensification, by denying the contrary of the thing being affirmed.
Local Color The use of details that are common to a certain place.
Metaphor A figure of speech that compares two unlike things by saying or implying that one thing is the other.
Overstatement Substitution of one word for another that it suggests.
Oxymoron An exaggeration or a stretching of the truth.
Paradox Connecting two words with opposite meanings.
Parallelism A true statement that says two opposite things.
Personification A figure of speech in which a nonhuman thing is given human characteristics.
Polysyndeton The repetition of conjunctions in a series of coordinate words, phrases, or clauses.
Pun A phrase that uses words that sound the same in a way that gives them a funny effect.
Sensory Details Details that are experienced through the senses to help the reader see, feel, smell, touch, hear, and taste what is being described.
Anecdote A brief story used to make a point.
Antistrophe Repetition of the same word or phrase at the end of successive clauses.
Antithesis Using opposite ideas to emphasize a point.
Apostrophe A sudden turn from the general audience to address a specific group or person or personified abstraction absent or present.
Archaism Use of an older or obsolete form.
Assonance Repetition of the same vowel sound in words close to each other.
Asyndeton Lack of conjunctions between coordinate phrases, clauses, or words.
Colloquialism A common word or phrase suitable for ordinary, everyday conversation but not for formal speech or writing.
Exaggeration An overstatement or stretching of the truth to emphasize a point.
Flashback A technique in which a writer interrupts a story to go back and explain an earlier time or event for the purpose of making something in the present more clear.
Foreshadowing Hints or clues about what will happen next in a story.
Hyperbole Exaggeration used to emphasize a point.
Irony A word or phrase in which the author says one thing but means just the opposite.
Juxtaposition Putting two words or ideas close together to create a contrasting of ideas or ironic meaning.
Litotes Understatement, for intensification, by denying the contrary of the thing being affirmed.
Local Color The use of details that are common to a certain place.
Metaphor A figure of speech that compares two unlike things by saying or implying that one thing is the other.
Overstatement An exaggeration or a stretching of the truth.
Oxymoron Connecting two words with opposite meanings.
Paradox Connecting two words with opposite meanings.
Parallelism Repeating similar grammatical structures—words, phrases, or sentences—to give writing rhythm.
Personification A figure of speech in which a nonhuman thing is given human characteristics.
Polysyndeton The repetition of conjunctions in a series of coordinate words, phrases, or clauses.
Pun A phrase that uses words that sound the same in a way that gives them a funny effect.
Sensory Details Details that are experienced through the senses to help the reader see, feel, smell, touch, hear, and taste what is being described.
Metonymy Substitution of one word for another that it suggests.
Created by: SPARTAN117