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Vocab for Chapter 13

Myers 7th Edition - Chapter 13 Vocabulary

TermDescription
Emotion A response of the whole organism, involving (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behaviors, and (3) conscious experience.
James-Lange theory The theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli.
Cannon-Bard theory The theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion.
Two-factor theory Schacter's theory that to experience emotion one must (1) be physically aroused and (2) cognitively label the arousal.
Polygraph A machine, commonly used in attempts to detect lies, that measures several of the physiological responses accompanying emotion (such as perspiration, cardiovascular and breathing changes).
Catharsis Emotional release. In psychology, the catharsis hypothesis maintains that "releasing" aggresive energy (through action and fantasy) relieves aggresive urges.
Feel-Good do-good phenomenon People's tendency to be helpful when in a good mood.
Subject well-being Self-perceived happiness or satisfaction with life. Used along with measures of objective well-being (for example, physical and economic indicators) to evaluate people's quality of life.
Adaptation-level phenomenon Our tendency to form judgments (of sounds, of lights, of income) relative to a "neutral" level defined by our prior experience.
Relative deprivation The perception that one is worse off relative to those with whom one compares oneself.
Created by: shellenberger on 2006-01-31



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