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Reading and Writing-Set 3

7 forms of writing development drawing,scribbling,letterlike forms,prephonemic spelling,copying,invented spelling,conventional spelling
Writing stage 1: drawing The drawing is not an illustration for a story but is the story itself. The child reads the drawing as though it were text.
Writing stage 2: scribbling The scribbling resembles a line of writing. It may have the appearance of a series of waves or, in a more advanced representation, may resemble a series of letterlike forms.
Writing stage 3: letterlike forms resemble manuscript/cursive letters and are generally written as separate forms rather than the continuous forms seen in scribbling. They are not real letters, and care needs to be taken that poorly formed real letters are not placed in this category.
Writing stage 4: prephonemic spelling The child writes with real letters, but the letters are a random collection or a meaningless pattern, such as repeating the same letter. Although the letters are real, they do not represent sounds.
Writing stage 5: copying The child copies from print found in his or her environment: signs, labels, etc.
Writing stage 6: invented spelling Students make use of the alphabetic principle. The letters they write represent sounds. Initially, one letter may represent a whole word. Over time, there is a gradual movement to conventional spelling. Has several stages
Writing stage 7: conventional spelling student's spelling is conventional
Created by: kristi01