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WGU INC1 Exam Review

Review of Guiding questions and Terms in the CoS for INC1

QuestionAnswer
How is the scientific method, and the process of science used to solve problems? The scientific method is used to solve problems by keen oberservations,rational analysis, and experimentation.
Name the Components of the Scientific Method: Observation,Question,Hypothesis,Prediction, Conclusion.
What is a Theory? A synthesisof facts and well-tested hypthoesis about certain aspects of the natural world; supported by a massive body of evidence.
What is a Fact? An observation that can be oberved upon and agreed to be true by competent observers.
What is a Law? A general hypothesis or statementabout relationship of natural quantitiesthat has been tested over and over again, and has not been contradicted.
What is a hypothesis? A supposition or proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation.
What is the principal of falsifiability? For a hypothesis to be scientific it must be testable. It must, in principle, be capable of being proven wrong.
What did Galieleo do to challenge Aristotle's belief that heavy objects faster than ligher objects? Galileo performed an experiments by dropping objects off of the Leaning Tower of Pisa and found that they fall at the same rate.
How might creativity be used in science and use in generating testable ideas? Creativity is used in Science by involving mental process through creative problem solving and the discovery of new ideas or concepts, or new associations of the existing ideas or concepts, fueled by the process of either conscious or unconcious insight.
What might might be important when designing a controlled science experiment? Elements of challenge, adventure, and suprise along with careful planning,reasoning,creativity,cooperation, competition,patience,and the persistence to overcome setbacks.
How does a hypothesis differ from a scientific theory? When a scientific hypothesis has been tested over and over agains and has not been contradicted it may become known as a law. While a theory is a synthesis of facts and well tested hypotheses.
What is the difference between science and technology? Technology is a tool of science
Physics sutdy of basic concepts such as motion,force, energy, matter, heat, sound, and light.
Chemistry builds of physics, and sutdies how matter is put together to producethe gorwing list of materials and medicines we use in our everyday lives.
Biology the study of life and living things.
Earth Science include the study of geology, meteorology, and oceanography
Astronomy the study of nature beyond the confines of earth.
Explain the limitations of science, and how science differs from other areas such as art and religion. Science can't answer questions about value,morality,or the supernatural. Science can only answer questions that have testable answers.
What does degrees Kelvin measure? Temperature
What does Kilograms measure? Amount of matter in an object.
What does pH stand for? "potential of Hydrogen"
What is pH used for? pH is a scale used to measure level of acids and bases.
What does Joules measure? Energy and Work
What does Newtons measure? Force
What does liters measure? Volume
What does grams measure? Measure of mass of a solid.
What does Kilometers per hour (k/hr) measure? speed of an object
What does meters/second/second measure? Speed of a falling object.
What does Ohms measure? resistance to an electic current.
What does Ampere measure? The amount of electric current moving pas a point.
What is a simple machine? A device that multiplies force or changes the direction of a force.
What is the equation for work? Work=Force x Distance (w=FxD)
What four ways does a simple machine effect work output? 1. Transferring Force from one place to another 2.Changing the Direction of Force 3.Increasing the magnitude of a force 4.Inceasing the distance or speed of a force.
What is potential energy? Stored energy that has the potential to do work.
What factors affect the amount of gravitational potential energy? Height and weight
Define Thermal Enegy Internal energy of an object due to the kinetic energy of the atoms
What is the law of conservation of energy? Energy can not be created or destroyed only changed from one form to another.
What is gravitational force? The force of attraction between two objects that have mass
Explain what happens to gravitational force if there is a change to mass or distance. The greater the mass the greater the force gravity exerts, and when objects are further apart the force of gravity becomes weaker.
What is the inverse square law? The inverse square law states that physical quanities or strenting is proportional to the square of the distance from the source.
What is projectile motion? An object that is projected by some means will continue in motion with it's own inertia whiles gravity acts on the object as well as bringing it down.
How does an object become a satellite? When an object orbits around a primary object at a constant speed.
What happens to a sattelite when its speed exceeds 8km/s? The orbit becomes eliptical.
What is the role of gravity in the formation of solar systems and galaxies? Gravity makes particles in space attract untill stars and planets are formed.
How does gravity affect objects in the solar system? Gravity keeps planets and stars in place
Why does the same side of the moon always face the earth? The moon spins at the same rate as its orbit.
Explain the relationship between thermal energy and gravitational force in a star's life cycle. Thermal energy exertsa foce from the center of a star otwards and gravity exerts a force outside of a star inward towards the center. When these two forces balance out the star has reached its size and mass.
How does gravity affect a black hole? A black hole is the remains of a super giant star that has collapsed in on itself. It contains so much gravity that light cannot escape.
How does a gravitational field affect light? Light curves in a gravatational field.
Define Coulomb's Law like charges repel while opposites attract.
Define Newton's law of universal gravity. Gravity only attracts
How is Coulombs Law regaring electrical force similar to Newton's law of universal gravitation? the electrical force descrease inversely as the square of the distance between charges changes.
How does Coulomb's law differ from Newton's Law of universal gravitation? Instead of gravity being a small number, K is a big number. Also gravitation is only concerned with attracting forces while Coulomb's Law includes opposing forces.
What is Newtons's first law of motion? Object at rest will stay at rest unless acted on by an outside force, and an object in motion will not change direction unless acted upon by an outside force.
What is Newton's Second law of motion? The accelration of a body is directly proportional to the amount of force acting upon it,and inversely proportional to the mass of the body. F=ma
What is Newton's third law of Motion? For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
What is a wave? A disturbance that travesl through spance and time accompanied by the transfer of energy.
amplitude the height of a wave or intensity.
wavelength the distance between peaks in a wave
Frequency Number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time.
period time it takes for two succesive wave crest to pass a given point.
Radio Waves part of the electromagnectic spectrum and have the longest wavelength. Used for communication.
Longitudal Wave particle displacement is parallel to the direction of wave propagation IE: Sound waves in air, slinky
Transverse Wave particle displacement is perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. IE: ripple in a pond.
Compare light waves and sound waves light waves travel at speed of light,through empty space, and denser materials slow them down. Sound waves travel at speed of sound, and require a medium to travel through, and denser materials speed up sound waves.
What changes pitch of sounds? changes in the sounds frequency
What makes submerged objects appear closer to the surface than they actually are? refraction
Reflection Light travels in straight lines, and will reflect off a surface at the same angle in which it impacted a surface.
Refraction Light changes direction when traveling through mediums, because it either speeds up or slows down.
Diffraction The bending of light around a barrier.
Contructive Interference Addition of two waves when the crest of one wave over laps another so that their individual effects add together.
Destructive Interference interfence of two waves of the same frequency cancelling each other out.
Doppler Shift result of wave source and observer in motion. Frequency increases when closer and appears to decrease when further apart
How does light act as a wave? Travels as a wave from the source
How does light act like a particle? behaves as a stream of photons when it hits a sheet of metal.
What are the electro magnetic waves? Gamma,X-ray,Ultraviolet,Infared,Microwave,Radio
What determines the energy of a electromagnetic wave? The wavelength
Electromagnectic wave mechanism by which electro magnetic energy moves. Composed of both an electric and magnetic wave.
How are electromagetic waves the same? They travel at the speed of light in a vacuum
How are electro magnetic waves different? Frequency and Intensity
Describe the structer of an atom? Electrons surrounding a nucleus of protons and neutrons
What makes an atom radioactive? Too many or not enough neutrons
Alpha Particle +2 electric charge consists of two protrons and two neutrons large wave
Beta Particle small particle exactly like electron with -1 charge
Gamma Ray emitted from unstable nucleus has no charge.
Radiation Absorbed Dose (R.A.D) Measures the amount of radiation energy transferred to some mass. Recognizes not all masses absorb same amount of energy
What does electric force do in an atom? keeps electrons bound to the nucleus
What does strong nuclear force do in an atom? Keeps the protons and neutrons bound in the nucleus
Created by: slprice51 on 2013-05-05



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