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Pericarditis lists

Acute vs. Constrictive Pericarditis

Acute Pericarditis - onset, duration: • Onset occurs within two weeks of the “offending” condition • May last up to 6 weeks
Acute Pericarditis - Etiology • Acute injury • Fibrin, white blood cells, and endothelial cells are released and cover pericardium • Friction between layers causing irritation and inflammation
Acute Pericarditis - symptoms • Chest pain • Chills • Fever • Sweating
Acute Pericarditis - complications • Pericardial Effusion • Tamponade • Constrictive pericarditis
Constrictive Pericarditis - description • A thickened, fibrotic and adherent pericardium restricting diastolic filling of the heart • Most start with acute pericarditis/PE • *Pericardium undergoes fibrotic thickening, calcification and fusion (like a scab or scar)
Constrictive Pericarditis - etiology • Idiopathic (most common cause US) • TB (most common in underdeveloped countries) • Chronic renal failure • Lupus • Post cardiac surgery or pericardiotomy • Post PE • Tumor involvement • Recurrent pericarditis
Constrictive Pericarditis - symptoms • JVD (hallmark finding) • Pericardial knock • Minimal PE present • “Square root sign” – equalization of diastolic pressures in 4 chambers • Weakness/fatigue • Weight loss/muscle wasting • Abdominal distension • Hepatomegaly • Dyspnea • Ankle ed
Constrictive Pericarditis - complications • Decreased cardiac output • Congestive heart failure
Created by: lefut