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Analyzing Lit Part 4

Study cards for analzing lit CLEP

QuestionAnswer
Repetition Where a specific word, phrase, or structure is repeated several times, usually in close proximity, to emphasize a particular idea.
Setting The time and place where a story occurs. The setting can be specific (e.g., New York City in 1930) or ambiguous (e.g., a large urban city during economic hard times).
Simile An indirect relationship where one thing or idea is described as being similar to another. Similes usually contain the words “like” or “as,” but not always.
Speaker The “voice” of a poem; not to be confused with the poet him/herself. Analogous to the narrator in prose fiction.
Structure The manner in which the various elements of a story are assembled.
Symbolism The use of specific objects or images to represent abstract ideas.
Theme The main idea or message conveyed by the piece.
Tone The apparent emotional state, or “attitude,” of the speaker/narrator/narrative voice, as conveyed through the language of the piece.
Tragedy Where a story ends with a negative or unfortunate outcome which was essentially avoidable, usually caused by a flaw in the central character’s personality.
Tragic hero/tragic figure: A protagonist who comes to a bad end as a result of his own behavior, usually cased by a specific personality disorder or character flaw.
Tragic flaw The single characteristic (usually negative) or personality disorder which causes the downfall of the protagonist.
Verbal irony Where the meaning of a specific expression is, or is intended to be, the exact opposite of what the words literally mean.
Created by: ahermitt on 2009-09-29



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