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pd.7 group 3. Doc.1

info about doc. 1

info from websites:website URL's/ Work cited.
Marshall briefly studied law with George Wythe at the College of William and Mary before being admitted to the bar in 1780. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
Marshall's readings of the Constitution brought him into conflict with the Republican-Democrat opponents of the Federalists. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
In two cases, McCulloch vs. the State of Maryland, and Gibbons vs. Ogden, the rulings of the Supreme Court declared the principle of judicial power to set aside state legislative acts if they were in conflict with the federal Constitution. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
n 1797, President John Adams convinced John Marshall to serve as an envoy to France, where he became involved in the difficult so-called XYZ Affair. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
Enduring the hardships of the winter at Valley Forge (1777-1778), Marshall's admiration of Washington grew as did his resolve to help shape what was to become the new nation. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
On May 12,1800, Adams nominated Marshall to the post of Secretary of State. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
Marshall's readings of the Constitution brought him into conflict with the Republican-Democrat opponents of the Federalists. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
The Supreme Court, under the guidance of Marshall, also ruled that the federal judiciary could reverse a decision of a state court. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
The influence of his landmark decisions did much to strengthen the judicial branch of government and to define the tripartite arrangement that is so basic to the American system of government. http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
It was not long until John Marshall was known for his fairness, his belief in a strong federal government, and his acute intellect http://www.johnmarshallfoundation.org/legacy.htm
Created by: AnthonyRoinson1 on 2009-02-20



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