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unit 1 Vocabulary

chapter 1, 2, 3

sunbelt a group of southern states that stretches from the east coast all the way to california
reigons areas that are similar in terms of landscapes, climate, elevation, and plant and animal life
coastal plain the southernmost part of Georgia
fall line elevations rise suddenly from lower and higher land
piedmont a reigon that streches north from the fall line to the base of the blue ridge mountains
appalachian mountains a larger mountain range that streches from central alabama
blue ridge mountains stretches from Pennsylvania to Georgia. forms the easternmost range of the Appalachian mountains.
valley and ridge This region consists of a series of narrow, elongated, forested knobs and ridges, which are parallel to one another.
appalachian plateau the northwestern part of the Appalachian Mountains, stretching from New York to Alabama.
archaeologist scientists who study the past based on what ancient people left behind
artifacts objects that were made, modified, or used by humans
prehistoric period or periods from the times before written history
culture a way of life shared by people, with similar arts, beliefs, and costoms
paleo-indians the first people who lived in the Georgia reigon
archiac indians from 8000 BC to around 1000 BC these people lived in Georgia around this time.
woodland indians from 1000 BC to around 900 AD these people lived in Georgia
renaissance the European civilization from 1300 to 1600 characterized by an increased interest in art and learning
merchantalism an economic theory in which government controls trade and establishes colonies to obtain gold, silver, and natural resources to create wealth and a favorable balance of trade for the parent country
monopoly complete control over an entire supply of goods or service in a particular market
conquistadors a Spanish soldier and explorer who led military expeditions in the Americas and captured land for Spain
joint-stock company a business formed by a group of people who jointly make an investment and share in profits and losses
gulfstream a powerful ocean current that flows from the gulf of Mexico north along the east coast of North America before turning east toward Europe
charter a written contract issued by a government giving the holder the right to establish a colony, or a document setting the form and structure of a municipal government, its boundaries, and its powers
relative location a point or place in relation to another point or place
absolute location designated using a specific pairing of latitude and longitude in a Cartesian coordinate grid — for example, a Spherical coordinate system or an ellipsoid-based system such as the World Geodetic System
hemisphere a half of the earth, usually as divided into northern and southern halves by the equator, or into western and eastern halves by an imaginary line passing through the poles.
equator an imaginary line drawn around the earth equally distant from both poles, dividing the earth into northern and southern hemispheres and constituting the parallel of latitude 0°.
parallels each of the imaginary parallel circles of constant latitude on the earth's surface.
prime meridian a meridian (a line of longitude) in a geographical coordinate system at which longitude is defined to be 0°
meridians a great circle of the earth passing through the poles and any given point on the earth's surface.
latitude the angular distance north or south from the equator of a point on the earth's surface, measured on the meridian of the point.
longitude angular distance east or west on the earth's surface, measured by the angle contained between the meridian of a particular place and some prime meridian
compass rose a circle divided into 32 points or 360° numbered clockwise from true or magnetic north, printed on a chart or the like as a means of determining the course of a vessel or aircraft.
scale a succession or progression of steps or degrees; graduated series: the scale of taxation; the social scale.
goods commodities that are tangible, usually movable, and generally not consumed at the same time as they are produced Compare services
services he supplying or supplier of utilities or commodities, as water, electricity, or gas, required or demanded by the public.
imports to bring or introduce from one use, connection, or relation into another
exports to send or transmit (ideas, institutions, etc.) to another place, especially to another country.
climate the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, sunshine, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years.
weather the state of the atmosphere with respect to wind, temperature, cloudiness, moisture, pressure, etc.
missisipian a mound-building Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1600
anthropoiogist a person who specializes in the science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, and social customs and beliefs of humankind.
culture the quality in a person or society that arises from a concern for what is regarded as excellent in arts, letters, manners, scholarly pursuits, etc.
antiquities the quality of being ancient; ancientness
horticulture the cultivation of a garden, orchard, or nursery; the cultivation of flowers, fruits, vegetables, or ornamental plants.
Clovis points the characteristically-fluted projectile points associated with the North American Clovis culture.
mounds a natural elevation of earth; a hillock or knoll.
palisade a fence of pales or stakes set firmly in the ground, as for enclosure or defense.
wooly mammoth a species of mammoth that lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with Mammuthus subplanifrons in the early Pliocene.
barter economy a cashless economic system in which services and goods are traded at negotiated rates
maize a pale yellow resembling the color of corn.
bow and arrow a projectile weapon system (a bow with arrows) that predates recorded history and is common to most cultures. Archery is the art, practice, or skill of applying it.
projectile points ( arrow heads ) an object that was hafted to a projectile, such as a spear, dart, or arrow, or perhaps used as a knife.
colonization to form a colony of
Spanish missions The Spanish missions in the Americas were Christian missions established by the Spanish Empire during the 15th to 19th centuries
barrier islands long, narrow, offshore deposits of sand or sediment that run parallel to the coastline. They are separated from the main land by a shallow sound, bay, or lagoon and are often found in chains along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico.
influence the capacity or power of persons or things to be a compelling force on or produce effects on the actions, behavior, opinions, etc., of others
smallpox an acute, highly contagious, febrile disease, caused by the variola virus, and characterized by a pustular eruption that often leaves permanent pits or scars
catholicism the faith, system, and practice of the Catholic Church, especially the Roman Catholic Church.
new world The New World is one of the names used for the Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas.
shale a rock of fissile or laminated structure formed by the consolidation of clay or argillaceous material.
tribe any aggregate of people united by ties of descent from a common ancestor, community of customs and traditions, adherence to the same leaders, etc.
clan a group of families or households, as among the Scottish Highlanders, the heads of which claim descent from a common ancestor
sherds a historic or prehistoric fragment of pottery
nomads a member of a people or tribe that has no permanent abode but moves about from place to place, usually seasonally and often following a traditional route or circuit according to the state of the pasturage or food supply.
effigy a representation or image, especially sculptured, as on a monument.
atlatl A spear-thrower
cheifdom the rank or office of a chief.
beringia a vast area between the Kolyma River in the Russian Far East to the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories of Canada
middens a dunghill or refuse heap.
moat a deep, wide trench, usually filled with water, surrounding the rampart of a fortified place, as a town or a castle.
podium a small platform for the conductor of an orchestra, for a public speaker
mastrodon a massive, elephantlike mammal of the genus Mammut (Mastodon), that flourished worldwide from the Miocene through the Pleistocene epochs and, in North America, into recent times, having long, curved upper tusks and, in the male, short lower tusks.
pottery ceramic ware, especially earthenware and stoneware.
oral tradition a community's cultural and historical traditions passed down by word of mouth or example from one generation to another without written instruction.
wattle and daub a form of wall construction consisting of upright posts or stakes interwoven with twigs or tree branches and plastered with a mixture of clay and straw.
mound builders the various American Indian tribes who, in prehistoric and early historic times, erected the burial mounds and other earthworks of the Mississippi drainage basin and southeastern U.S.
expiditions an excursion, journey, or voyage made for some specific purpose, as of war or exploration.
guale-sea island this region of Guale of which we are most concerned-St. Simons, Sea Island, Jekyll, Darien
fur trade a worldwide industry dealing in the acquisition and sale of animal fur.
monarchy a state or nation in which the supreme power is actually or nominally lodged in a monarch.
protestant any Western Christian who is not an adherent of a Catholic, Anglican, or Eastern Church.
Created by: leo messi