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B - WORDS

B - WORDS GMAT

WordMeaningExample
Baleful (adj.) harmful, malign, detrimental After she was fired, she realized it was a baleful move to point the blame at her superior. The strange liquid could be baleful if ingested.
Banal (adj.) trite; without freshness or originality Attending parties became trite after a few weeks. It was a banal suggestion to have the annual picnic in the park, since that was where it had been for the past five years.
Baneful (adj.) deadly or causing distress, death Not wearing a seat belt could be baneful.
Baroque (adj.) extravagant; ornate; embellished The baroque artwork was made up of intricate details which kept the museum-goers enthralled. The baroque furnishings did not fit in the plain, modest home.
Bastion (n.) a fortified place or strong defense The strength of the bastion saved the soldiers inside of it.
Batten (v.) to gain The team could only batten by drafting the top player.
Bauble (n.) a showy yet useless thing The woman had many baubles on her bookshelf.
Beget (v.) to bring into being The king wished to beget a new heir.
Beholden (adj.) indebted to The children were beholden to their parents for the car loan.
Behoove (v.) to be advantageous; to be necessary It will behoove the students to buy their textbooks early.
Belittle (v.) to make small; to think lightly of The unsympathetic friend belittled her friend's problems and spoke of her own as the most important.
Bellicose (adj.) quarrelsome; warlike The bellicose guest would not be invited back again.
Bemuse (v.) to preoccupy in thought The girl was bemused by her troubles.
Benefactor (n.) one who helps others; a donor An anonymous benefactor donated $10,000 to the children's hospital.
Beneficent (adj.) conferring benefits; kindly; doing good He is a beneficent person, always taking in stray animals and talking to people who need someone to listen. A beneficent donation helped the organization meet its goal.
Benevolent (adj.) kind; generous The professor proved a tough questioner, but a benevolent grader. The benevolent gentleman volunteered his services.
Benign (adj.) mild; harmless A lamb is a benign animal, especially when compared with a lion.
Berate (v.) scold; reprove; reproach; criticize The child was berated by her parents for breaking the china.
Bereft (v.; adj.) to be deprived of; to be in a sad manner; hurt by someone's death The loss of his job will leave the man bereft of many luxuries. The widower was bereft for many years after his wife's death.
Beseech (v.) to ask earnestly The soldiers beseeched the civilians for help.
Besmirch (v.) to dirty or discolor The soot from the chimney will besmirch clean curtains.
Bestial (adj.) having the qualities of a beast; brutal The bestial employer made his employees work in an unheated room.
Betroth (v.) to promise or pledge in marriage The man betrothed his daughter to the prince.
Biased (adj.) prejudiced; influenced; not neutral The vegetarian had a biased opinion regarding what should be ordered for dinner.
Biennial (adj.; n.) happening every two years; a plant which blooms every two years The biennial journal's influence seemed only magnified by its infrequent publication. She has lived here for four years and has seen the biennials bloom twice.
Bilateral (adj.) pertaining to or affecting both sides or two sides; having two sides A bilateral decision was made so that both partners reaped equal benefits from the same amount of work. The brain is a bilateral organ, consisting of a left and right hemisphere.
Blasphemous (adj.) irreligious; away from acceptable standards; speaking ill of using profane language The upper-class parents thought that it was blasphemous for their son to marry a waitress. His blasphemous outburst was heard throughout the room.
Blatant (adj.) obvious; unmistakable; crude; vulgar The blatant foul was reason for ejection. The defendant was blatant in his testimony.
Blighted (adj.) causing frustration or destruction The blighted tornado left only one building standing in its wake.
Blithe (adj.) happy; cheery; merry; a cheerful disposition The wedding was a blithe celebration. The blithe child was a pleasant surprise.
Bode (v.) to foretell something The storm bode that we would not reach our destination.
Bombast (n.) pompous speech; pretentious words After he delivered his bombast at the podium, he arrogantly left the meeting. The presenter ended his bombast with a prediction of his future success.
Bombastic (adj.) pompous; wordy; turgid The bombastic woman talks a lot about herself.
Boor (n.) a rude person The boor was not invited to the party, but he came anyway.
Breadth (n.) the distance from one side to another The table cloth was too small to cover the breadth of the table.
Brevity (n.) briefness; shortness On Top 40 AM radio, brevity was the coin of the realm.
Brindled (adj.) mixed with a darker color In order to get matching paint we made a brindled mixture.
Broach (v.) to introduce into conversation Broaching the touchy subject was difficult.
Brusque (adj.) abrupt in manner or speech His brusque answer was neither acceptable nor polite.
Bucolic (adj.) having to do with shepherds or the country The bucolic setting inspired the artist.
Bumptious (adj.) arrogant He was bumptious in manner as he approached the podium to accept his anticipated award.
Bungler (n.) a clumsy person The one who broke the crystal vase was a true bungler.
Burgeon (v.) to grow or develop quickly The tumor appeared to burgeon more quickly than normal. After the first punch was thrown, the dispute burgeoned into a brawl.
Burlesque (v.; n.) to imitate in a non-serious manner; a comical imitation His stump speeches were so hackneyed, he seemed to be burlesquing of his role as a congressman. George Burns was considered one of the great practitioners of burlesque.
Burly (adj.) strong; bulky; stocky The lumberjack was a burly man.
Burnish (v.) to polish by rubbing The vase needed to be burnished to restore its beauty.
Created by: Alex Moscow on 2008-07-25



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