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"P" and "Q" Words

Quiz yourself by thinking what should be in each of the black spaces below before clicking on it to display the answer.
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Paleontology (noun)   study of past geological eras through fossil remains  
Pallid (adj)   lacking color or liveliness  
Paragon (noun)   model of excellence or perfection  
Partisan (adj)   one-sided; committed to a party or group or cause; prejudiced  
Pathological (adj)   departing from normal condition  
Pathos (noun)   quality that causes a feeling of pity or sorrow  
Patois (noun)   a regional dialect; nonstandard speech; jargon  
Paucity (noun)   scarcity  
Penchant (noun)   inclination  
Peregrination (noun)   a wandering from place to place  
Peremptory (adj)   imperative; leaving no choice  
Perfidious (adj)   faithless; disloyal; untrustworthy  
Perigee (noun)   point in an orbit that is closest to the Earth  
Permeable (adj)   penetrable  
Perturb (verb)   to disturb greatly; make uneasy or anxious; cause a body to deviate from its regular orbit  
Perturbation (noun)   disturbance  
Pervasive (adj)   having the tendency to permeate or spread throughout  
Petulant (adj)   rude; peevish  
Phoenix (noun)   mythical, immortal bird that lives for 500 years, burns itself to death, and rises from its ashes; anything that is restored after suffering great destruction  
Physiognomy (noun)   facial features  
Piety (noun)   devoutness  
Piquant (adj)   appealingly stimulating; pleasantly pungent; attractive  
Pique (noun)   fleeting feeling of hurt pride  
Pique (verb)   to provoke or arouse  
Placid (adj)   calm  
Plaintive (adj)   melancholy; mournful  
Plasticity (noun)   condition of being able to be shaped or formed; pliability  
Platonic (adj)   spiritual; without sexual desire; theoretical  
Plumb (verb)   to determine the depth; to examine deeply  
Plume (verb)   to congratulate oneself in a self-satisfied way  
Plutocracy (noun)   society ruled by the wealthy  
Porous (adj)   full of holed; permeable to liquids  
Poseur (noun)   person who affects an attitude or identity to impress others  
Pragmatism (noun)   practical way of approaching situations or solving problems  
Prate (verb)   to talk idly; chatter  
Preamble (noun)   preliminary statement  
Precarious (adj)   uncertain  
Precept (noun)   principle; law  
Preempt (verb)   to supersede; appropriate for oneself  
Prehensile (adj)   capable of grasping  
Premonition (noun)   forewarning; presentiment  
Presage (verb)   to foretell; indicate in advance  
Presumptuous (adj)   rude; improperly bold  
Preternatural (adj)   beyond the normal course of nature; supernatural  
Primordial (adj)   original; existing from the beginning  
Problematic (adj)   posing a problem; doubtful; unsettled  
Profound (adj)   deep; not superficial  
Profundity (noun)   the quality of being profound  
Prohibitive (adj)   so high as to prevent the purchase or use of; preventing; forbidding  
Propriety (noun)   correct conduct; fitness  
Proscribe (verb)   to condemn; forbid; outlaw  
Proscriptive (adj)   relating to prohibition  
Provident (adj)   providing for future needs; frugal  
Punctilious (adj)   careful in observing rules of behavior or ceremony  
Purport (verb)   to profess; suppose; claim  
Purport (noun)   intended or implied  
Paean (noun)   a song or hymn of praise and thanksgiving  
Palliate (verb)   to make something seem less serious, to gloss over, to make less severe or intense  
Panegyric (noun)   formal praise, eulogy, encomium  
Parody (noun)   a humorous imitation intended for ridicule or comic effect, esp. in literature and art  
Parsimonious (adj)   cheap, miserly  
Pedagogy (noun)   the profession or principles of teaching or instructing  
Pedantic (adj)   overly concerned with the trivial details of learning or education; show-offish about one's knowledge  
Pedestrian (adj)   commonplace, trite, unremarkable, quotidian  
Pellucid (adj)   transparent, easy to understand, limpid  
Penurious (adj)   penny-pinching; excessively thrifty; ungenerous  
Penury (noun)   poverty; destitution  
Perennial (adj)   recurrent through the year or many years; happening repeatedly  
Perfidy (noun)   intentional breach of faith; treachery  
Perfunctory (adj)   cursory; done without care or interest  
Pernicious (adj)   extremely harmful; potentially causing death  
Peroration (noun)   the concluding part of a speech; flowery, rhetorical speech  
Perspicacious (adj)   acutely perceptive; having keen discernment  
Peruse (verb)   to examine with great care  
Pervade (verb)   to permeate throughout  
Phlegmatic (adj)   calm; sluggish; unemotional  
Pied (adj)   multicolored, usually in blotches  
Pine (verb)   to lose vigor (as through grief); to yearn  
Pious (adj)   extremely reverent or devout; showing string religious devotion  
Pirate (verb)   to illegally use or reproduce  
Pith (noun)   the essential or central part  
Pithy (adj)   precise and brief  
Placate (verb)   to appease; to calm by making concessions  
Plangent (adj)   pounding, thundering, resounding  
Plastic (adj)   moldable, pliable, not rigid  
Platitude (noun)   a superficial remark, esp. one offered as meaningful  
Plethora (noun)   an overabundance; a surplus  
Pluck (noun)   courage, spunk, fortitude  
Plummet (verb)   to plunge or drop straight down  
Polemical (adj)   controversial; argumentative  
Pragmatic (adj)   practical rather than idealistic  
Prattle (verb)   to babble meaninglessly; to talk in an empty and idle manner  
Precipitate (adj)   acting with excessive haste or impulse  
Precipitate (verb)   to cause or happen before anticipated or required  
Precursor (noun)   one that precedes and indicates or announces another  
Predilection (noun)   a disposition in favor of something; preference  
Preen (verb)   to dress up; to primp to groom oneself with elaborate care  
Prescience (noun)   foreknowledge of events; knowledge of events prior to their occurrence  
Presumptuous (adj)   overstepping due bonds (as of propriety or courtesy); taking liberties  
Prevaricate (verb)   to deliberately avoid the truth; to mislead  
Pristine (adj)   pure; uncorrupted; clean  
Prize (verb)   to pry, to press or force with a lever; something taken by force, spoils  
Probity (noun)   adherence to highest principles; complete and confirmed integrity; uprightness  
Proclivity (noun)   a natural predisposition or inclination  
Prodigal (adj)   recklessly wasteful; extravagant; profuse; lavish  
Prodigious (adj)   abundant in size, force, or extent; extraordinary  
Profligate (adj)   excessively wasteful; recklessly extravagant  
Profuse (adj)   given or coming forth abundantly; extravagant  
Proliferate (verb)   to grow or increase swiftly and abundantly  
Prolific (adj)   producing large volumes or amounts; productive  
Prolix (adj)   long-winded, verbose  
Propensity (noun)   a natural inclination or tendency; penchant  
Propitiate (verb)   to appease; to conciliate  
Prosaic (adj)   dull; lacking in spirit or imagination  
Puerile (adj)   childish, immature, jejune, nugatory  
Puissance (noun)   power, strength  
Pungent (adj)   characterized by a strong, sharp smell or taste  
Pusillanimous (adj)   cowardly, craven  
Putrefy (verb)   to rot; to decay and give off a foul odor  
Quagmire (noun)   marsh; difficult situation  
Quibble (verb)   to argue over insignificant and irrelevant details  
Quorum (noun)   number of members necessary to conduct a meeting  
Quaff (verb)   to drink deeply  
Quail (verb)   to lose courage; to turn frightened  
Qualify (verb)   to limit  
Qualms (noun)   misgivings; reservations; causes for hesitancy  
Queries (noun)   questions; inquiries; doubts in the mind; reservations  
Querulous (adj)   prone to complaining or grumbling; peevish  
Quiescence (adj)   stillness; motionless; quality of being at rest  
Quixotic (adj)   foolishly impractical; marked by lofty romantic ideals  
Quotidian (adj)   occurring or recurring daily; commonplace  


   





 
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