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Therputic Study Note


Factors associated with greater compliance are? increased self esteem, high motivation, increased fitness level, experince with exercise, increased pain tolerance, higher education, alertness, understanding of goals.
Strategies to improve compliance are ? Explain the rationale of each exercise, how it can benifit them in their daily life, have patient keep exercise log, allow them to provide imput in their exercise routine....
Define ROM the normal ammount of movement in a joint, the ammount of motion allowed between 2 boney levers.
What structures will be affected when moving through ROM? Muscle, ligament, joint capsule, synovial fluid, bones, cartilage
What position should we use to range biceps into it's fully lengthened postion? Extend the elbow and extend the shoulder
Define muscle range the distance a muscle is capable of lenghtening
Some factors that decrease ROM are .... Injury, patholgies, neurological diseases, surgury
What is active insufficency? the inability of a muscle to produce force when shortened.
What is passive insufficency? the inablilty to stretch to the extent required when all joints are crossed
ROM is contraindicated when a client has a recent tendon repair, true or false? False, because it might tear
ROM is contraindicated when a client has had a recent knee replacement, True or false? False, they need to move it right away to preserve ROM
Define Passive ROM where the clinician provides the external force needed to complete full ROM without ANY assistance from the client. Clinician would NOT apply overpressure
When is passive ROM indicated?? accute or inflamed tissues, where active movement could hurt the patient, patient cannot move ex. coma, relaxaion, teaching.
What are some benifits of passive ROM? maintains joint & tissue integrity, minimizes potential for contracture, improves local circulation, decreases pain.
What are some cons of passive ROM? does not prevent muscle atrophy, does not increase strength, will not decrease adipose tissue.
Define Acitive assisted ROM Using an external force to assist patients to preform the movement.
When would a patient preform active assisted motions? When the patient has some but not full ROM.
What are some benifits of active assisted ROM ? maintains contractility, provides stimuli to bone, increases crculation
What is active ROM? movement that is produced solely by the client, does not require an external force.
What are 2 of the most common condtions with the L/E? 1. Total Hip Replacement (THR) 2. Total Knee Replacement (TKR)
What are 2 restrictions for a client with a THR? Not allowed to flex hip past 90 degrees, cannot corss their legs.
What is active insufficency? Muscle becomes less effective (produces less force) as it reaches maximal shortness
What is Passive insufficency? Antagonistic muscle limits motion because it is stretched
"end feels" are divided based on 2 sets of ceiteria, what are they? 1.Sensory 2. Appropriateness ( physiclogical or patholgical)
If a concave surface is moving on a fixed convex surface the glide will be in __________ direction? the glide will be in the same direction
If the convex surface is moving on a fixed concave surface the glide will be in the __________ direction to the roll opposite
Define Creep the gradual change in shape/length of a tissue when subjected to a slow and gradual force
What is static stretching? a slow and sustained stretch
What is ballistic stretching? rapid bouncing movements that are used to force muscles to elongate
Describe Hold- Relax stretching Requires an isometric (without movement) contraction of the tight muscle before stretching. Hold the contraction for 15 sec then take the muscle to stretch postion and hold for 15 to 30 seconds.
Describe Contract-Relax Stretching patient performs an isotonic contraction of the tight muscle against resistance, then take the muscle into stretch and hold for 15 to 30 sec
Describe Agonist Contraction patient performs a concentric contraction of the muscle opposite to the tight muscle against light resistance, hold for 15 to 30 sec
describe Hold-Relax With Agonist contraction Start with an isometric contraction of the tight muscle, then relax the tight muscle and perform an isotonic contraction of the opposite muscle, hold for 15 to 30 seconds
What is a contracture? the adaptive shortening of muscles,tendons, and other soft tissues surrounding a joint. This results in a resistance to stretch and limitiation of ROM
What are some contraindications for stretching? an accute fracture, signs of inflammation, sharp pain with movement, Hypermobility
What is endurance? the ablity to sustain a specific activity at a given velocity for a prolonged period of time
Explain Adaptation people will adapt to training and stimulis over time
When can Adaptation occour? 10 - 12 weeks
Deconditioning can be caused by ? immobility or bed rest
What is reversability? "use it or loose it" detraining ocours when people stop exercising.
When can reversabiliy occour? within 2 weeks prior to haulted exercise program
What does the VO2 Max test? Aerobic Capacity
What are some benifits of exercising? decreased blood pressure, increased lung volumes, decreased body fat, decreased cholesterol, increased bone density
How many times should someone exercise? 3-4 times per week
What are the 3 components of an exercise program? 1. Warm up 2. Activity 3. Cool-down
What are some benifits of a warm-up? incrases muscle temp, increases circulation, preps body for activity
What are some benifits of a cool-down? prevents dizziness and fainting, allows heart rate to slow gradually.
To see results how much should we increase our heart rate? 20 BPM
What is the maximum heart rate for a male? 220
What is the maximum heart rate for a female? 226
People should train at _______ of their MHR? 70-80% of their MHR
What is the definition of resistance exercise? any form of active exercie in which a static or dynamic muscle contraction is resisted by an outside force
Muscle perfomance is ? the ability of a muscle to do work
Strength is? the ability of contractile tissue to produce tension
What is power? the rate of performing work (time component)
What are the 3 key principals of resistance exercise? 1.overload principal 2. SAID principal 3.Reversability principal
Describe the overload Principal To increase strength a load exceeding the capacity of the muscle must be used in the exercise
What is the SAID principal? Body systems will adapt over time to stresses placed on them (wolfs law)
What does the said principal stand for? Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands
What is duration in relation to exercise? the ammount of days, weeks, or months that the exercise program will take place
What is mode? the form that the exercise takes ex. mechanical
Describe Volume the product of the total number of repitions and resistance during an exercise session
What is the Vaalsalva Manoueuver? when client holds their breath
What is concentric resistance? tension in a muscle deveops and muscle shortens ex. lifting a weight
What is open chain exercise? the distal segment moves freely in space, usually done in NWB ex. squats
What is closed chain exercise? body moves on distal segment that is fixed or stabilized on a support surface ex. wall push up
What are some atvantages of closed chain exercises? allows for greater joint stability, decreased risk for sliding, dynamic stability
What are some atvantages for open chain exercises? targets specific muscles, dont require WB, greater control
Describe the DeLorme Protocol based on a 10 RM, requires 3 sets and 3 min rest intervals, 1st set is at 50% of 10 RM, 2nd set is at 75% of RM, 3rd set is at 100% of RM
Describe the DAPRE protocol based on a 1 RM using 4 sets, all the sets are the same as DeLorme but the 4th set depends on the clients preformance on the 3rd set, weather to increase/decrease the weight or reps
What are the 3 main types of muscle fibers? 1. Type 1 - Slow 2. Type 2 - fast fatigue resistant 3. Type 3 - fast fatigable
For power and strength training what muscle fibers would be recruited?? type 2 and 3
What are 2 main types of muscle soreness? 1. acute muscle soreness 2. Delayed onset muscle sorenes
What is acute muscle sorenes?? occours during or right after exercise, feels like a burning or aching within the muscle, caused by a buildup of lactic acid
What is Delayed onset muscle soreness? Develops 12-24 hours after exercise, soreness increases with passive stretch or contraction of the muscle, etiology is unknown
What is the 5 principals of pilates? 1.breathing 2.Pelvic placement 3. Rib cage placement 4. scapular movement/stabilization 5. Head and cervical placement
what are the 6 conciderations when working with athletes? 1. endurance 2. flexibility 3. power 4. agility 5. speed 6. quickness
How would you strengthen the abdominals with a swiss ball? figure 8's in sitting, balance on one foot, back on ball, sit ups
How would you strengthen the shoulders ball on wall exercise, prone rows, serratus push ups
What are some differences that children have compaired to adults? higher respiratory rate, higher heart rate,higher metabolic demands, poor thermalregulation
What are 4 steps to maximize impact therapy when working with children? 1. prepare 2.motivation 3. Engage 4. Distract
How would do to prepare a child for therapy? educate the child and family, tell them about what they should do or feel
How would you motivate a child for therapy? ecnouragement and praise, keep it goal directed, create checkpoints where they can keep motivate
How would you stretch the trunk in a child? reaching activities
How would you stretch the ankle in a child? get them to step on their tippy toes
How would you help increase their knee ROM? leap fog
What are some benifits of strengthening in children? improved self esteem, fitness, improved body composition, increased strength, increased bone density, and joint protection
What age should a child start a strengthening routine? age 5 so they have developed body awareness and control
What are some techniques for strenghening with a child? need supervision, focus on technique not intensity, incorporate a warm up and cool down, light weights with controlled repitions
what should you concider when working with geriatrics? they can have decreased vision, hearing, and balance
How would you motivate an elderly person to do their exercises? encourage, motivate- focus on health benifits, make it a social interaction
Name the 5 possible benifits for strengthening in the ederly 1. improved memory 2. improvement in ADL's 3. decreased falls 4. psychological benifits 5. improved cognition
What are some guidelines when strengthening for a geratric patient? ask them to see their doc. first, concider comorbidities, have longer rest between sets and sessions, focus on arms , utilize machines
Created by: lyirwin