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Micro 5-2

Duke PA micro

What are the four medically important clostridium infections? C. perfringens, C. botulinum, C. tetani, C. difficile
How does C. perfringens grow in vitro? easily and rapidly
Human disease caused by C. perfringens ranges from mild gastroenteritis to severe myonecrosis
5 serotypes of C. perfringens A-E
Which serotypes of C. perfringens responsible for most human disease? type A
virulence factors - C. perfringens "lethal toxins"
A-toxin a lecithinase is produced in large quantities by type A strains of C. perfringens
How does C. tetani grow in vitro? difficult to grow in vitro
What is characteristic of C. tetani on Gram stain? terminal endospore
Virulence factors - C. tetani hemolysin, neurotoxin
What does the neurotoxin in C. tetani do? causes clinical expression of tetanus by blocking neurotransmitter release
What is the etiologic agent of botulism? C. botunlinum
What groups is C. botulinium divided into? I, II, III, IV - likely represents 4 different species
What modulates disease cause by C. botulinum? neurotoxin, types A-G (antigenically distinct)
What are the three clinical presentations of botulism? food borne, infant botulism, wound botulism
What is the most common etiologic agent of antibiotic associated colitis (AAC)? C. difficile
C. difficile - normal flora GI, in some
What are the virulence factors of C. difficile? toxin A: enterotoxin toxin B: cytotoxin
What allows C. difficile to survive in hospital environment? spore formation
Where is C. difficile infection increasing? in community outpatient populations - scary!!
Is C. difficile an anaerobe or aerobe? strict anaerobe
What are the symptoms of AAC? can be anything from relatively mild diarrhea to colectomy
Lactobacillus - normal flora mouth, GI, GU
How is lactobacillus often recovered? in large numbers of specimens (especially urine) as "contaminents"
What are the clinical presentations of lactobacillus? transient bacteremia, endocarditis, opportunistic septicemia
How do mobiluncus and gardnerella appear on Gram stain? Gram negative or Gram variable
How are mobiluncus and gardnerella classified (gram negative or positive)? gram positive
Why are mobiluncus and gardnerella gram positive? Gram positive cell wall, antibiotic susceptibility similar to Gram positive, lack endotoxin
Where do mobiluncus and garnerella colonize in large numbers? female genital tract
What happens to number of mobiluncus and gardnerella in bacterial vaginitis? increase dramatically
Mobiluncus spp M. curtisii, M. mulieris
Propionibacterium genus of small, gram positive rods
How do propionibacterium appear on gram stain? clumps or chains
Is propionibacterium an aerobe or anaerobe? anaerobes: some aerotolerant
Propionibacterium - normal flora skin, oropharynx, female genital tract
Most medically important species of Propionibacterium P. acnes
Created by: ges13