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Chapter 2 population

Chapter 2: population: Mrs. Dyer, Northgate high

QuestionAnswer
a measurement of the number of people per given unit of land population density
the population of a country or region expressed as an average per unit area. the figure is derived by dividing the population of the areal unit by the number of square kilometers or miles that make up the unit. arithmetic population density
the number of people per unit area of arable land physiological population density
descriptions of locations on the earth's surface where populations live population distribution
maps where one dot represents a certain number of a phenomenon, such as population dot map
term used to designate large coalescing supercities that are forming in diverse parts of the world. megalopolis
a periodic and official count of a country's population census
the time required for a population to double in time doubling time
the rapid growth of the worlds human population during the past century, attended by ever-shorter doubling times and accelerating rates of increase population explosion
population growth measured as the excess of live births and deaths. natural increase
the number of live births yearly per thousand people in a population crude birth rate
the number of deaths yearly per thousand people in a population crude death rate
multistage model, based on western europe's experience, of changes in population growth exhibited by countries undergoing industrialization. high birth rates are folowed by pluging death rates, producing a huge net population gain, followed by decrease demographic transition
the level at which a national population ceases to grow stationary population level
structure of a population in terms of age, sex, and other properties such as marital status and education population composition
visual representations of the age and sex composition of a poulation whereby the percentage of each age group (generally five-year increments) is represented by a horizontal bar the length of which represents its relationships to the total population. population pyramids
a figure that describes the number of babies that die within the first year of their lives in a given population infant mortality rate
a figure that describes the number of children that die between the first and fifth years of their lives in a given population child mortality rate
a figure indicating how long, on average, a person may be expected to live. mormally expressed in the context of a particular state life expectancy
Immune sysem disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus which over a period of years weakens the capacity of the immune system to fight off infection so that weight loss and weakness set in and other afflictions may hasten an infected persons deah AIDS
generally long lasting afflictions now more common because of higher life expectancies chronic diseases
government policies that encourage large families and raise the rate of population growth expansive population policies
government policies designed to favor one racial sector over others eugenic population policies
governmental policies designed to reduce the rate of natural increase restrictive population policies
Created by: swaldrop93 on 2009-01-17



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