Test Android StudyStack App
Please help StudyStack get a grant! Vote here.
or...
Reset Password Free Sign Up


incorrect cards (0)
correct cards (0)
remaining cards (0)
Save
0:01
To flip the current card, click it or press the Spacebar key.  To move the current card to one of the three colored boxes, click on the box.  You may also press the UP ARROW key to move the card to the Correct box, the DOWN ARROW key to move the card to the Incorrect box, or the RIGHT ARROW key to move the card to the Remaining box.  You may also click on the card displayed in any of the three boxes to bring that card back to the center.

Pass complete!

Correct box contains:
Time elapsed:
Retries:
restart all cards



Embed Code - If you would like this activity on your web page, copy the script below and paste it into your web page.

  Normal Size     Small Size show me how

Integumentary

NPTE: Integumentary (scorebuilder 2008)

QuestionAnswer
Exudate classification: presents as clear, light color with a thin, watery consistency serous
Exudate classification: presents as red with a thin, watery consistency sanguineous • appears to be red due to presence of blood, or may be brown if allowed to dehydrate
Exudate classification: presents as light red or pink with a thin, watery consistency serosanguineous
Exudate classification: presents as opaque, yellow or tan color with thin, watery consistency seropurulent • may be an early warning sign of impending infection.
Exudate classification: presents as yellow or green with a thick viscous consistency purulent • indicative of infection
pressure ulcer staging • Stage I observable pressure-related alteration of intact skin. • may include: change in skin color, temperature, stiffness, or sensation
pressure ulcer staging • Stage II partial-thickness skin loss. involves epidermis and/or dermis. • ulcer is superficial and presents as abrasion, blister or a shallow crater.
pressure ulcer staging • Stage III full-thickness skin loss that involves damage or necrosis of subcutaneous tissues. May extend to but not through underlying fascia. • presents as a deep crater with or without undermining adjacent tissue.
pressure ulcer staging • Stage IV full-thickness skin loss with extensive destruction, tissue necrosis, or damage to muscle, bone, or supporting structures.
Wagner Grade 0 no open lesion but may possess pre-ulcerative lesions; healed ulcers; presence of bony deformity.
Wagner Grade 1 superficial ulcer not involving subcutaneous tissue
Wagner Grade 2 deep ulcer with penetration through the subcutaneous tissue; potentially exposing bone, tendon, ligament, or joint capsule
Wagner Grade 3 deep ulcer with osteitis, abscess or osteomyelitis.
Wagner Grade 4 gangrene of digit
Wagner Grade 5 gangrene of foot requiring disarticulation
Superficial burn involves only outer epidermis. area may be red with slight edema. no scarring.
Superficial partial-thickness burn involves epidermis and upper portion of the dermis. may be extremely painful and exhibit blisters. minimal to no scarring.
Deep partial-thickness burn involves complete destruction of the epidermis and majority of dermis. may appear discolored with broken blisters and edema. damages to nerve endings may result in only moderate pain. hypertrophic scars and keloids.
Full thickness burn involves complete destruction of epidermis and dermis along with partial damage of subcutaneous fat layer. eschar formation and minimal pain. requires grafts and may be susceptible to infection.
Subdermal burn involves complete destruction of epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissues. may involve muscle and bone. often requires surgical intervention.
Definition: zone of coagulation the area of the burn that received the most severe injury along with irreversible cell damage.
Definition: zone of stasis the area of less severe injury that possesses reversible damage and surrounds the zone of coagulation.
Definition: zone of hyperemia the area surrounding the zone of stasis that presents with inflammation, but will fully recover without any intervention or permanent damage.
Rule of nines: • Head and neck 9%
Rule of nines: • Anterior trunk 18%
Rule of nines: • Posterior trunk 18%
Rule of nines: • Bilateral anterior arm, forearm, hand 9%
Rule of nines: • Bilateral posterior arm, forearm, hand 9%
Rule of nines: • Genital region 1%
Rule of nines: • Bilateral anterior LE 18%
Rule of nines: • Bilateral posterior LE 18%
Rule of nines: • How do children differ? Child under 1 has 9% taken from the LEs and added to head region. Each year of life, 1% is added back to the LEs.
Topical agents used in burn care: • Can be used with or without dressing • silver sulfadiazine
Topical agents used in burn care: • Is painless • Silver sulfadiazine • Silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • can be applied to wound directly • silver sulfadiazine
Topical agents used in burn care: • broad-spectrum • silver sulfadiazine • silver nitrate • povidone-iodine mafenide acetate gentamicin nitrofurazone
Topical agents used in burn care: • non-allergenic • silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • effective against yeast • silver sulfadiazine
Topical agents used in burn care: • antifungal • povidone-iodine
Topical agents used in burn care: • easily removed with water • povidone-iodine
Topical agents used in burn care: • penetrates burn eschar • mafenide acetate
Topical agents used in burn care: • may be used with or without occlusive dressing • mafenide acetate
Topical agents used in burn care: • may be covered or left open to air • gentamicin
Topical agents used in burn care: • bacteriocidal • nitrofurazone
Topical agents used in burn care: • does not penetrate into eschar • silver sulfadiazine • silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • discolors, making assessment difficult • silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • can cause severe electrolyte imbalance • silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • removal of dressing is painful • silver nitrate
Topical agents used in burn care: • not effective against pseudomonas • povidone-iodine • nitrofurazone
Topical agents used in burn care: • may impair thyroid function • povidone-iodine
Topical agents used in burn care: • painful application • povidone-iodine • mafenide acetate • nitrofurazone
Topical agents used in burn care: • may cause metabolic acidosis • mafenide acetate
Topical agents used in burn care: • may compromise respiratory function • mafenide acetate
Topical agents used in burn care: • may inhibit epithelialization • mafenide acetate
Topical agents used in burn care: • causes resistant strains • gentamicin
Topical agents used in burn care: • ototoxic • gentamicin
Topical agents used in burn care: • nephrotoxic • gentamicin
Topical agents used in burn care: • may lead to overgrowth of fungus and pseudomonas • nitrofurazone
definition: allograft temporary skin graft taken from another human, usually cadaver
definition: autograft permanent skin graft taken from a donor site on the pt.'s body
definition: heterograft temporary skin graft taken from another species.
definition: mesh graft skin graft that is altered to create a mesh-like appearance in order to cover a larger surface area.
definition: sheet graft skin graft is transferred directly from the donor site to the recipient site.
definition: split-thickness skin graft a skin graft that contains only a superficial layer of the dermis in addition to the epidermis
definition: full-thickness skin graft a skin graft that contains the dermis and the epidermis
burn location: anticipated deformity: • anterior neck flexion with possible lateral flexion
burn location: splinting type: • anterior neck soft collar, molded collar, philadelphia collar
burn location: splinting type: • anterior chest and axilla axillary or airplane splint, shoulder abduction brace
burn location: anticipated deformity: • anterior chest and axilla shoulder adduction, extension, and medial rotation
burn location: anticipated deformity: • elbow flexion and pronation
burn location: splinting type: • elbow gutter splint, conforming splint, three-point splint, air splint
burn location: anticipated deformity: • hand extension or hyperextension of the MCP joints, flexion of the IP jts, adduction and flexion of the thumb, flexion of the wrist
burn location: splinting type: • hand wrist splint, thumb spica splint, palmar or dorsal extension splint
burn location: anticipated deformity: • hip flexion and adduction
burn location: splinting type: • hip anterior hip spica, abduction splint
burn location: anticipated deformity: • knee flexion
burn location: splinting type: • knee conforming splint, three point splint, air splint
burn location: anticipated deformity: • ankle plantarflexion
burn location: splinting type: • ankle posterior foot drop splint, posterior ankle conforming splint, anterior ankle conforming splint
selective or non-selective debridement? • sharp selective
selective or non-selective debridement? • enzymatic selective
selective or non-selective debridement? • autolytic selective
selective or non-selective debridement? • wet-to-dry non-selective
selective or non-selective debridement? • wound irrigation non-selective
selective or non-selective debridement? • hydrotherapy non-selective
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • location: lower one-third of leg arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • location: toes, web spaces arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • location: dorsal foot arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • location: lateral malleolus arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • location: proximal to medial malleoulus venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • appearance: smooth edges, well defined arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • appearance: lack granulation tissue arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • appearance: tend to be deep arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • appearance: irregular shape venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • appearance: shallow venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • pain: severe arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • pain mild to moderate venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • pedal pulse: diminished or absent arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • pedal pulse: normal venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • no edema arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • increased edema venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • skin temperature: decreased arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • skin temperature: normal venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: thin and shiny arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: hair loss arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: yellow nails arterial
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: flaking venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: dry skin venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • tissue changes: brownish discoloration venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • leg elevation decreases pain venous insufficiency
arterial or venous insufficiency ulcer? • leg elevation increases pain arterial
Dressing: used for partial and full-thickness wounds • Hydrocolloids • Foam Dressings • Alginates
Dressing: used for granular or necrotic wounds • Hydrocolloids
Dressing: provides a moist environment for wound healing • Hydrocolloids • Hydrogels • Foam Dressings • Transparent film
Dressing: Enables autolytic debridement • Hydrocolloids • Hydrogels • Foam Dressings • Transparent Films • Alginates
Dressing: Offers protection from microbial contamination • Hydrocolloids • Alginates
Dressing: Provides moderate absorption • Hydrocolloids • Foam Dressing
Dressing: Does not require a second layer • Hydrocolloids • Adhesive version of Foam Dressing • Gauze
Dressing: Provides a waterproof surface • Hydrocolloids
Dressing: May traumatize surrounding intact skin upon removal • Hydrocolloids • Adhesive form of Foam Dressing • Adhesive form of Transparent film • Gauze
Dressing: May tend to roll in areas of excessive friction • Hydrocolloids • Foam Dressings
Dressing: Cannot be used on infected wounds • Hydrocolloids • Transparent films
Dressing: Used for superficial and partial-thickness wounds • Hydrogels • Transparent films
Dressing: Used for minimal drainage • Hydrogels • Transparent films
Dressing: May reduce pain/pressure • Hydrogels
Dressing: Can be used as coupling agent for ultrasound • Hydrogels
Dressing: Minimally adheres to wound • Hydrogels
Dressing: Potential for dressing to dehydrate • Hydrogels
Dressing: Cannot be used on wound with significant drainage • Hydrogels • Transparent Films
Dressing: Typically requires second dressing • Hydrogels • Non-adhesive form of Transparent films • Alginates
Dressing: Used for varying levels of exudate • Foam dressings (up to moderate level of absorption) • Gauze
Dressing: Provides protection and cushioning • Foam dressings
Dressing: Lack of transparency makes inspection of wound difficult • Foam dressing
Dressing: Allows visualization of wound • Transparent films • Some Hydrocolloids
Dressing: resistant to shearing forces • Transparent films
Dressing: cost-effective • Transparent films (over time) • Gauze
Dressing: Excessive accumulation of exudate can result in maceration • Transparent films
Dressing: Can be used for wet-to-wet, wet-to moist, or wet-to-dry debridement • Gauze
Dressing: Can be used on infected or non-infected wounds • Gauze • Alginates
Dressing: Can be used alone or in combination with other dressings or topical agents • Gauze
Dressing: Can modify number of layers to accomodate for changing wound status • Gauze
Dressing: Adheres to wound • Gauze
Dressing: Requires frequent dressing change • Gauze • Alginates
Dressing: non-occlusive --> increased infection rate • Gauze
Dressing: Used for pressure wounds or venous insufficiency ulcers • Alginates
Dressing: moisture-retentive • Hydrogels
Dressing: High absorptive capacity • Alginates
Dressing: non-adhering to wound or skin • Alginates
Dressing: cannot be used on wounds with exposed tendon, joint capsule or bone • Alginates
Which dressing would you use? minimal drainage pressure ulcer stage II, keep under frequent observation • Transparent Film
Which dressing would you use? moderate drainage pressure ulcer stage IV, want to observe it. • Hydrocolloids (a transparent one)
Dressing: Order from most to least occlusive: • Hydrocolloids • Hydrogels •Semi-permeable foam • Semi-permeable film • Impregnated gauze • Alginates • Normal (traditional) gauze
Which dressing would you use? pt. with diabetes, pressure ulcer on 1st met. head, Stage III, infected • Alginates
Which dressing would you use? pt. with diabetes, pressure ulcer on 1st met. head, Stage IV, necrotic • Hydrocolloids
Which dressing would you use? pt. with diabetes, pressure ulcer on 1st met. head, stage IV, infected • Gauze • since it's infected, can't used hydrocolloids. since it's stage IV can't use alginates - exposed tissue.
Dressing: Most moisture retentive to least: • Alginates • Semi-permeable foam • Hydrocolloids • Hydrogels • Semi-permeable films
Created by: liz124714 on 2008-12-28



Copyright ©2001-2014  StudyStack LLC   All rights reserved.