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Skin Structure


Acne Also known as acne vulgaris; skin disorder characterized by chronic inflammation of the sebaceous glands from retained secretions and propionibacterium acnes bacteria.
Arrector Pili Muscles Small, involuntary muscles in the base of the hair follicle that cause goose flesh, sometimes called goose bumps, and papillae.
Callus Thickening of part of the skin on the hands or feet caused by repeated rubbing.
Collagen Fibrous protein that gives the skin form and strength.
Comedo Blackhead.
Dermal Papillae (Singular: Dermal Papilla) Small, cone-shaped elevations at the base of the hair follicles that fit into the hair bulb.
Dermatologist Physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating disorders of the skin.
Dermatology Medical branch of science that deals with the study of skin and its nature, structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.
Dermis The inner layer of the skin.
Elastin Protein base similar to collagen that forms elastic tissue.
Epidermal-Dermal Junction The top of the papillary layer where it joins the epidermis.
Epidermis Outermost layer of the skin.
Esthetician A specialist in the cleansing, preservation of health, and beautification of the skin and body.
Eumelanin A brownish-black pigment.
Keratin Fiber protein that is the principal component of hair and nails.
Melanin Tiny grains of pigment, coloring matter that are produced by melanocytes and deposited into cells in the stratum germinativum layer of the epidermis and in the papillary layers of the dermis.
Melanocytes Cells that produce melanin.
Motor Nerve Fibers Fibers of the motor nerves that are distributed to the arrector pili muscles attached to hair follicles. Motor nerves carry impulses from the brain to the muscles.
Papillary Layer Outer layer of the dermis, directly beneath the epidermis.
Papule Pimple; small circumscribed elevation on the skin that contains no fluid but may develop pus.
Pheomelanin A type of melanin that is red to yellow in color. People with light-colored skin mostly produce pheomelanin. there are two types of melanin; the other type is eumelanin.
Propionibacterium Acnes Abbreviated p acnes; technical term for acne bacteria.
Pustule A small inflamed elevation of skin containing pus.
Reticular Layer Deeper layer of the dermis that supplies the skin with oxygen and nutrients; contains cells, vessels, glands, and follicles.
Sebaceous Glands Also known as oil glands; glands connected to hair follicles. sebum is the fatty or oily secretion of the sebaceous glands.
Sebum Fatty or oily secretion produced by the sebaceous glands.
Secretory Coil Coiled base of sweat glands.
Secretory Nerve Fibers Fibers of the secretory nerve that are distributed to the sudoriferous glands and sebaceous glands.
Sensory Nerve Fibers Fibers of the sensory nerves that react to heat, cold, touch, pressure, and pain. sensory receptors that send messages to the brain.
Stratum Corneum Outermost layer of the epidermis, which consists of flattened, keratinized (horny) cells.
Stratum Germinativum Also known as the basal cell layer, the deepest live layer of the epidermis that produces new epidermal skin cells and is responsible for growth.
Stratum Granulosum Layer of the epidermis composed of cells filled with keratin that resemble granules; replace cells shed from the stratum corneum..
Stratum Lucidum Clear, transparent layer of the epidermis under the stratum corneum.
Stratum Spinosum The spiny layer just above the stratum germinativum layer.
Subcutaneous Tissue Also known as adipose or subcutis tissue; fatty tissue found below the dermis that gives smoothness and contour to the body, contains fat for use as energy, and also acts as a protective cushion for the outer skin.
Sudoriferous Glands Also known as sweat glands; excrete perspiration and detoxify the body by excreting excess salt and unwanted chemical.
Tactile Corpuscles Small epidermal structures with nerve endings that are sensitive to touch and pressure.
Vitamin A Supports the overall health of the skin; aids in the health, function, and repair of skin cells; has been shown to improve the skins elasticity and thickness.
Vitamin C An important substance needed for proper repair of the skin and tissues; promotes the production of collagen in the skins dermal tissues; aids in and promotes the skins healing process.
Vitamin D Enables the body to properly absorb and use calcium, the element needed for proper bone development and maintenance. Vitamin D also promotes rapid healing of the skin.
Vitamin E Helps protect the skin from the harmful effects of the sun's UV light.
Created by: samkohlenberg